Peculiar transient events in the Schumann resonance band and their possible explanation

Adriena Ondrášková, J. Bór, Sebastián Ševčík, Pavel Kostecký, Ladislav Rosenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Superimposed on the continuous Schumann resonance (SR) background in the extremely low frequency (ELF) band, transient signals (e.g. bursts) can be observed, which originate from intense lightning discharges occurring at different locations on the globe. From the many transients that were observed at the Astronomical and Geophysical Observatory (AGO) of Comenius University near Modra, western Slovakia, in the vertical electric field component mainly during May and June of 2006, a peculiar group of events could be recognized. According to the waveform analysis, these peculiar events in most cases consist of two overlapping transients with a characteristic time difference of 0.13-0.15 s between the onsets. On the other hand, the spectrum of these peculiar transients showed discernible SR peaks for higher modes as well (n>7). The same events could be found in the records of the Széchenyi István Geophysical Observatory of the Geodetic and Geophysical Research Institute of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences near Nagycenk, Hungary (NCK). The natural origin of the peculiar events was verified from the NCK data and the source location was determined from the second transient. The results suggest that the two consecutive transients originated in the same thunderstorm. Furthermore, the phase spectrum analysis indicates that the sources have coherently excited the Earth-ionosphere cavity. These findings seem to support the idea that electromagnetic waves orbiting the Earth might trigger lightning discharges. The possibility that electromagnetic waves may trigger discharges was first considered by Nikola Tesla.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)937-946
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics
Volume70
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2008

Fingerprint

electromagnetic wave
lightning
geophysical observatories
observatory
waveform analysis
Hungary
thunderstorm
electric field
ionosphere
electromagnetic radiation
cavity
actuators
Slovakia
Earth ionosphere
extremely low frequencies
astronomical observatories
thunderstorms
globes
spectrum analysis
bursts

Keywords

  • Earth-ionosphere cavity resonator
  • Flashes
  • Impulsive events
  • Q-bursts
  • Schumann resonances
  • Triggered lightning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geophysics
  • Space and Planetary Science

Cite this

Peculiar transient events in the Schumann resonance band and their possible explanation. / Ondrášková, Adriena; Bór, J.; Ševčík, Sebastián; Kostecký, Pavel; Rosenberg, Ladislav.

In: Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics, Vol. 70, No. 6, 04.2008, p. 937-946.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ondrášková, Adriena ; Bór, J. ; Ševčík, Sebastián ; Kostecký, Pavel ; Rosenberg, Ladislav. / Peculiar transient events in the Schumann resonance band and their possible explanation. In: Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics. 2008 ; Vol. 70, No. 6. pp. 937-946.
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