Patterns in the collective behavior of humans

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Can we reliably predict and quantitatively describe how large groups of people behave? Here we discuss an emerging approach to this problem which is based on the quantitative methods of statistical physics. We demonstrate that in cases when the interactions between the members of a group are relatively well defined (e.g, pedestrian traffic, synchronization, panic) the corresponding models reproduce relevant aspects of the observed phenomena. In particular, people moving in the same environment typically develop specific patterns of collective motion including the formation of lanes, flocking or jamming at bottlenecks. We simulate such phenomena assuming realistic interactions between particles representing humans. The two specific cases to be discussed in more detail are waves produced by crowds at large sporting events and the main features of pedestrian escape panic under various conditions. Our models allow the prediction of crowd behavior even in cases when experimental methods are obviously not applicable and, thus, are expected to be useful in assessing the level of security in situations involving large groups of excited people.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAIP Conference Proceedings
Pages1-15
Number of pages15
Volume779
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 20 2005
EventMODELING COOPERATIVE BEHAVIOR IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES: Eighth Granada Lectures - Granada, Spain
Duration: Feb 7 2005Feb 11 2005

Other

OtherMODELING COOPERATIVE BEHAVIOR IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES: Eighth Granada Lectures
CountrySpain
CityGranada
Period2/7/052/11/05

Fingerprint

panic
jamming
traffic
escape
emerging
synchronism
interactions
physics
predictions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Patterns in the collective behavior of humans. / Farkas, I.; Vicsek, T.

AIP Conference Proceedings. Vol. 779 2005. p. 1-15.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Farkas, I & Vicsek, T 2005, Patterns in the collective behavior of humans. in AIP Conference Proceedings. vol. 779, pp. 1-15, MODELING COOPERATIVE BEHAVIOR IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES: Eighth Granada Lectures, Granada, Spain, 2/7/05. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2008587
Farkas, I. ; Vicsek, T. / Patterns in the collective behavior of humans. AIP Conference Proceedings. Vol. 779 2005. pp. 1-15
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