Patterns in ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) assemblages along an urbanisation gradient in Denmark

Z. Elek, Gábor L. Lövei

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The responses of ground beetles to an urbanisation gradient (forest-suburban area-urban park) were studied in and near Sorø, South Zealand, Denmark, during April-October 2004. The average number of species per trap did not differ significantly among the three urbanisation stages. The average number of forest species was significantly higher in the forest area (6.2 species/trap) than in either the suburban (4.12 spp/trap) or the urban (3.7 spp/trap) areas. Both the number of open-habitat species (1.8 spp/trap), and the generalist species (2.3 spp/trap) were highest in the urban area. The number of predaceous species was highest in the forest area (8.1 spp/trap), while the number of omnivorous species was highest in the urban area (0.9 spp/trap). Multivariate statistical procedures (NMDS, Sorensen similarity index) also confirmed that species composition changed remarkably along the forest-suburban-urban gradient. The highest number of species (S = 37) was found at the urban area, deviating from trends at other northern hemisphere sites (Canada, Finland) where the overall species richness was highest at the forest habitats. Urban green areas, including forest patches contribute to the quality of urban life and thus should be conserved. Apart from their recreational value, which is widely appreciated and enjoyed by human inhabitants, such green urban spaces provide seemingly adequate habitat for numerous species of ground beetles found in less developed forest areas some distance from the city core.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)104-111
Number of pages8
JournalActa Oecologica
Volume32
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2007

Fingerprint

Carabidae
urbanization
Denmark
beetle
traps
Coleoptera
urban areas
urban area
suburban areas
species diversity
habitat
forest habitats
habitats
similarity index
suburban area
Finland
generalist
Canada
Northern Hemisphere
species richness

Keywords

  • Denmark
  • Forest species
  • Ground beetles
  • Urbanisation gradient

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation

Cite this

Patterns in ground beetle (Coleoptera : Carabidae) assemblages along an urbanisation gradient in Denmark. / Elek, Z.; Lövei, Gábor L.

In: Acta Oecologica, Vol. 32, No. 1, 07.2007, p. 104-111.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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