Patho-epigenetics of infectious diseases caused by intracellular bacteria

Hans Helmut Niller, J. Mináróvits

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In multicellular eukaryotes including plants, animals and humans, epigenetic reprogramming may play a role in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of diseases. Recent studies revealed that in addition to viruses, pathogenic bacteria are also capable to dysregulate the epigenetic machinery of their target cells. In this chapter we focus on epigenetic alterations induced by bacteria infecting humans. Most of them are obligate or facultative intracellular bacteria that produce either bacterial toxins and surface proteins targeting the host cell membrane, or synthesise effector proteins entering the host cell nucleus. These bacterial products typically elicit histone modifications, i.e. alter the “histone code”. Bacterial pathogens are capable to induce alterations of host cell DNA methylation patterns, too. Such changes in the host cell epigenotype and gene expression pattern may hinder the antibacterial immune response and create favourable conditions for bacterial colonization, growth, or spread. Epigenetic dysregulation mediated by bacterial products may also facilitate the production of inflamatory cytokines and other inflammatory mediators affecting the epigenotype of their target cells. Such indirect epigenetic changes as well as direct interference with the epigenetic machinery of the host cells may contribute to the initiation and progression of malignant tumors associated with distinct bacterial infections.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
PublisherSpringer New York LLC
Pages107-130
Number of pages24
Volume879
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Publication series

NameAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Volume879
ISSN (Print)00652598
ISSN (Electronic)22148019

Fingerprint

Epigenomics
Communicable Diseases
Bacteria
Histones
Machinery
Histone Code
Bacterial Toxins
Pathogens
Cell membranes
Viruses
Gene expression
Tumors
Membrane Proteins
Animals
Cells
Cytokines
Bacterial Proteins
Protein Transport
DNA Methylation
Eukaryota

Keywords

  • Cholesterol-dependent cytolysin
  • Downregulation of imprinted genes
  • Histone code
  • Inflammatory cytokines
  • Intracellular bacteria
  • Nuclear effector
  • Nucleomodulin protein
  • SET-domain protein
  • Short-chain fatty acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Niller, H. H., & Mináróvits, J. (2016). Patho-epigenetics of infectious diseases caused by intracellular bacteria. In Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (Vol. 879, pp. 107-130). (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology; Vol. 879). Springer New York LLC. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-24738-0_6

Patho-epigenetics of infectious diseases caused by intracellular bacteria. / Niller, Hans Helmut; Mináróvits, J.

Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Vol. 879 Springer New York LLC, 2016. p. 107-130 (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology; Vol. 879).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Niller, HH & Mináróvits, J 2016, Patho-epigenetics of infectious diseases caused by intracellular bacteria. in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. vol. 879, Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, vol. 879, Springer New York LLC, pp. 107-130. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-24738-0_6
Niller HH, Mináróvits J. Patho-epigenetics of infectious diseases caused by intracellular bacteria. In Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Vol. 879. Springer New York LLC. 2016. p. 107-130. (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-24738-0_6
Niller, Hans Helmut ; Mináróvits, J. / Patho-epigenetics of infectious diseases caused by intracellular bacteria. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Vol. 879 Springer New York LLC, 2016. pp. 107-130 (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology).
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