Parental impacts on development: How proximate factors mediate adaptive plans

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In the light of the theory of evolution, parental impacts, like other environmental stimuli, are hypothesized to be processed by children's evolved psychological mechanisms. Various behavioural algorithms, decision rules, learning programs, and epigenetic rules transform input from the family context into behavioural output that presumably solved adaptive problems in evolutionarily relevant environments. This is why evolved physiological and psychological processes, considered as proximate mechanisms, are so crucial in the evolutionary explanations of human behaviour. This article clarifies the specific ways in which these mechanisms channel behavioural acts into adaptive decisions. A central task is to gain insights into the details of socialisation: how children process the information that comes from their parents and how this shapes adaptive patterns and states during development.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationOxford Handbook of Evolutionary Psychology
PublisherOxford University Press
ISBN (Print)9780191743658, 9780198568308
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 18 2012

Fingerprint

Physiological Phenomena
Psychology
Socialization
Epigenomics
Parents
Learning

Keywords

  • Adaptive decisions
  • Behaviour
  • Children
  • Evolution
  • Human
  • Parental impacts
  • Proximate mechanisms
  • Psychological mechanisms
  • Socialisation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Parental impacts on development : How proximate factors mediate adaptive plans. / Bereczkei, T.

Oxford Handbook of Evolutionary Psychology. Oxford University Press, 2012.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Bereczkei, T. / Parental impacts on development : How proximate factors mediate adaptive plans. Oxford Handbook of Evolutionary Psychology. Oxford University Press, 2012.
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