Pancreatic edema

Its effect on the function and morphology of the pancreas in dogs and rats

M. Papp, I. Fodor, G. Varga, G. Folly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Effects of pancreatic edema induced either by pancreatic ductal occlusion or by pancreatic ductal occlusion connected with stimulation of the acinar parenchyma was studied in rats. Ductal occlusion of three, 24 and 48 hours significantly increased the gland weight but decreased incorporation of (75Se) methionine into pancreatic protein. Stimulation of the pancreas in rats with ducts ligated for 24 and 48 hours was ineffective on the decreased (75Se) methionine incorporation. A three-hour occlusion of pancreatic juice flow caused a decrease in the secretion of pancreatic proteins on a second pancreatic stimulation given after releasing the ducts. The results suggest that pancreatic edema, or more precisely, ductal occlusion, induces changes in the pancreatic function which is acting as an intraglandular self-defense mechanism. Pancreatic edema as well as experimentally induced acute pancreatic necrosis raised the digestive enzyme activity in pancreatic interstitial fluids of dogs and rats; it reached 20%-30% of the enzyme activity of stimulated pancreatic juice collected before ductal occlusion or induction of pancreatitis. In pancreatic edema of dogs, the enzymatic activity remained high and unchanged in the interstitial fluid during the first 90 min after ductal occlusion, in acute pancreatic necrosis, however, it decreased. In pancreatic edema focal necrosis of acini, in experimentally induced pancreatic necrosis extensive necrosis of the acinar parenchyma was observed. This may suggest that digestive enzymes per se may not be the primary damaging factor in acute pancreatitis. In dogs and rats graded doses of secretin + CCK-PZ increased protein level and output in pancreatic juice. Occlusion of the stimulated juice in dogs and rats, or pancreatic stimulation without ductal ligation in rats, led to intraductal formation of protein plugs. The plugs can be demonstrated by histologic examination for 120-180 min after pancreatic stimulation. The intraductal plugs disappear as edema advances in duct ligated rats.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)456-464
Number of pages9
JournalMount Sinai Journal of Medicine
Volume49
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 1982

Fingerprint

Pancreas
Edema
Dogs
Necrosis
Pancreatic Juice
Extracellular Fluid
Pancreatitis
Methionine
Proteins
Enzymes
Secretin
Ligation
Weights and Measures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Pancreatic edema : Its effect on the function and morphology of the pancreas in dogs and rats. / Papp, M.; Fodor, I.; Varga, G.; Folly, G.

In: Mount Sinai Journal of Medicine, Vol. 49, No. 6, 1982, p. 456-464.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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