P-082. Inhibition of microflora associated with implants in oral cancer patients

K. Nagy, I. Vajdovich, L. Borbély, I. Sonkodi, E. Urbán

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Osseointegrated implants placed into the microvascularised grafted bone, offers an opportunity for improved function and esthetical satisfaction of patients, subjected to radical excision surgery. Aim: To maintain peri-implant hygiene with elimination of occasional inflammation, to reduce patient morbidity. Methods: Ten patients, (eight male, two female, mean age: 53.6 years, S.D. = ±8.4; five dentate, five edentulous) were selected for this study, and all were previously diagnosed with oral, squamous cell carcinoma and had undergone major tumour operation. All patients had a minimum of two osseointegrated implants (DenTi) inserted. Submucosal plaque sample was obtained with a sterile paper point before and after rinsing with Meridol® solution for 7 days three times a day, and were transported in 1 ml reduced BHI broth to the microbiology laboratory, and commenced within 1 h of sampling. Results: Plaque accumulation and clinical periimplant inflammation were generally higher in partially dentate patients, rather than in the edentulous ones. The median number of colony forming units (CFU/ml) found in the peri-implant region before and after rinsing with Meridol® were compared. The total aerobic mean count varied from 7×102 to 7×105 and that for anaerobes from 7×102 to 3×106. Actinomyces, Prevotella Intermedia, Enterococcus faecalis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, were found in greater proportion at the clinically inflamed peri-implant site. Conclusion: We can state that rinsing with Meridol the total count of bacteria showed reduction for both aerobes and anaerobes, although numbers were not significant (P>0.05). Our results also indicate, that the gingival sulci of the remaining dentition may act as a reservoir from which bacteria seed to dental implants inserted into transplanted bone graft. This study was partly supported by GABA International Ltd, Switzerland and OTKA T029322.

Original languageEnglish
JournalOral Oncology
Volume37
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
Publication statusPublished - 2001

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Mouth Neoplasms
Prevotella intermedia
Inflammation
Bacteria
Bone and Bones
Actinomyces
Porphyromonas gingivalis
Dentition
Dental Implants
Enterococcus faecalis
Microbiology
Hygiene
Switzerland
Patient Satisfaction
gamma-Aminobutyric Acid
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Seeds
Stem Cells
Morbidity
Transplants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

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P-082. Inhibition of microflora associated with implants in oral cancer patients. / Nagy, K.; Vajdovich, I.; Borbély, L.; Sonkodi, I.; Urbán, E.

In: Oral Oncology, Vol. 37, No. SUPPL. 1, 2001.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nagy, K. ; Vajdovich, I. ; Borbély, L. ; Sonkodi, I. ; Urbán, E. / P-082. Inhibition of microflora associated with implants in oral cancer patients. In: Oral Oncology. 2001 ; Vol. 37, No. SUPPL. 1.
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