Oxytocin activates mitogen-activated protein kinase and up-regulates cyclooxygenase-2 and prostaglandin production in human myometrial cells

Miklós Molnár, J. Rigó, Roberto Romero, Frank Hertelendy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The objective of our study was to test the hypothesis that oxytocin promotes prostaglandin production by up-regulating cyclooxygenase-2 via activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade in human myometrial cells. STUDY DESIGN: Confluent cultures of human myometrial cells obtained from uterine specimens of premenopausal women undergoing hysterectomy were serum starved for 48 hours before oxytocin stimulation. Prostacyclin levels, as 6-keto-prostaglandin F(1α), were measured by radioimmunoassay, and the cellular cyclooxygenase-2 protein content was determined by Western blot. Mitogen-activated protein kinase activity was assessed by measuring the phosphorylation of myelin basic protein. RESULTS: In a time- and dose-dependent manner oxytocin promoted prostacyclin production in human myometrial cells. Maximal responses were observed after 8 hours of stimulation at a dose of 100 nmol/L. This effect was mainly due to the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 protein. Within 5 minutes oxytocin significantly stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase, as compared with the expression in untreated controls. The maximal increase in enzyme activity (2.5-fold) was obtained at 45 minutes. A selective inhibitor of mitogen- activated protein kinase activation (PD98059), as well as herbimycin, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and the transcriptional blocker actinomycin D, suppressed oxytocin-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression and prostacyclin production. The stimulatory action of oxytocin was also sensitive to inhibition by pertussis toxin but appeared to be independent of protein kinase C activation. CONCLUSION: Our data indicate a largely unrecognized signal transduction mechanism for oxytocin, involving G-protein-coupled activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and cyclooxygenase-2 gene expression, leading to increased prostaglandin production in human myometrial cells. This signaling pathway complements the rapid activation of the phosphoinositide cycle and may be responsible for sustained release of prostaglandins in uterine tissues, promoting labor and parturition.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)42-49
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume181
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999

Fingerprint

Oxytocin
Cyclooxygenase 2
Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases
Prostaglandins
Up-Regulation
Epoprostenol
Myelin Basic Protein
Complement Activation
Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1
Pertussis Toxin
Prostaglandins F
Dactinomycin
Phosphatidylinositols
Hysterectomy
GTP-Binding Proteins
Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
Protein Kinase C
Radioimmunoassay
Signal Transduction
Proteins

Keywords

  • Cyclooxygenase-2
  • Human myometrial cells
  • Mitogen-activated protein kinase
  • Oxytocin
  • Prostaglandins
  • Signal transduction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Cite this

Oxytocin activates mitogen-activated protein kinase and up-regulates cyclooxygenase-2 and prostaglandin production in human myometrial cells. / Molnár, Miklós; Rigó, J.; Romero, Roberto; Hertelendy, Frank.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 181, No. 1, 1999, p. 42-49.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Rigó, J.

AU - Romero, Roberto

AU - Hertelendy, Frank

PY - 1999

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N2 - OBJECTIVE: The objective of our study was to test the hypothesis that oxytocin promotes prostaglandin production by up-regulating cyclooxygenase-2 via activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade in human myometrial cells. STUDY DESIGN: Confluent cultures of human myometrial cells obtained from uterine specimens of premenopausal women undergoing hysterectomy were serum starved for 48 hours before oxytocin stimulation. Prostacyclin levels, as 6-keto-prostaglandin F(1α), were measured by radioimmunoassay, and the cellular cyclooxygenase-2 protein content was determined by Western blot. Mitogen-activated protein kinase activity was assessed by measuring the phosphorylation of myelin basic protein. RESULTS: In a time- and dose-dependent manner oxytocin promoted prostacyclin production in human myometrial cells. Maximal responses were observed after 8 hours of stimulation at a dose of 100 nmol/L. This effect was mainly due to the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 protein. Within 5 minutes oxytocin significantly stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase, as compared with the expression in untreated controls. The maximal increase in enzyme activity (2.5-fold) was obtained at 45 minutes. A selective inhibitor of mitogen- activated protein kinase activation (PD98059), as well as herbimycin, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and the transcriptional blocker actinomycin D, suppressed oxytocin-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression and prostacyclin production. The stimulatory action of oxytocin was also sensitive to inhibition by pertussis toxin but appeared to be independent of protein kinase C activation. CONCLUSION: Our data indicate a largely unrecognized signal transduction mechanism for oxytocin, involving G-protein-coupled activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and cyclooxygenase-2 gene expression, leading to increased prostaglandin production in human myometrial cells. This signaling pathway complements the rapid activation of the phosphoinositide cycle and may be responsible for sustained release of prostaglandins in uterine tissues, promoting labor and parturition.

AB - OBJECTIVE: The objective of our study was to test the hypothesis that oxytocin promotes prostaglandin production by up-regulating cyclooxygenase-2 via activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade in human myometrial cells. STUDY DESIGN: Confluent cultures of human myometrial cells obtained from uterine specimens of premenopausal women undergoing hysterectomy were serum starved for 48 hours before oxytocin stimulation. Prostacyclin levels, as 6-keto-prostaglandin F(1α), were measured by radioimmunoassay, and the cellular cyclooxygenase-2 protein content was determined by Western blot. Mitogen-activated protein kinase activity was assessed by measuring the phosphorylation of myelin basic protein. RESULTS: In a time- and dose-dependent manner oxytocin promoted prostacyclin production in human myometrial cells. Maximal responses were observed after 8 hours of stimulation at a dose of 100 nmol/L. This effect was mainly due to the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 protein. Within 5 minutes oxytocin significantly stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase, as compared with the expression in untreated controls. The maximal increase in enzyme activity (2.5-fold) was obtained at 45 minutes. A selective inhibitor of mitogen- activated protein kinase activation (PD98059), as well as herbimycin, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and the transcriptional blocker actinomycin D, suppressed oxytocin-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression and prostacyclin production. The stimulatory action of oxytocin was also sensitive to inhibition by pertussis toxin but appeared to be independent of protein kinase C activation. CONCLUSION: Our data indicate a largely unrecognized signal transduction mechanism for oxytocin, involving G-protein-coupled activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and cyclooxygenase-2 gene expression, leading to increased prostaglandin production in human myometrial cells. This signaling pathway complements the rapid activation of the phosphoinositide cycle and may be responsible for sustained release of prostaglandins in uterine tissues, promoting labor and parturition.

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KW - Prostaglandins

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