Oxidative stress and antioxidative responses in plant-virus interactions

José Antonio Hernández, G. Gullner, María José Clemente-Moreno, András Künstler, Csilla Juhász, Pedro Díaz-Vivancos, Lóránt Király

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During plant-virus interactions, defence responses are linked to the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Importantly, ROS play a dual role by (1) eliciting pathogen restriction and often localized death of host plant cells at infection sites and (2) as a diffusible signal that induces antioxidant and pathogenesis-related defence responses in adjacent plant cells. The outcome of these defences largely depends on the speed of host responses including early ROS accumulation at virus infection sites. Rapid host reactions may result in early virus elimination without any oxidative stress (i.e. a symptomless, extreme resistance). A slower host response allows a certain degree of virus replication and movement resulting in oxidative stress and programmed death of affected plant cells before conferring pathogen arrest (hypersensitive response, HR). On the other hand, delayed host attempts to elicit virus resistance result in an imbalance of antioxidative metabolism and massively stressed systemic plant tissues (e.g. systemic chlorotic or necrotic symptoms). The final consequence of these processes is a partial or almost complete loss of control over virus invasion (compatible infections).

Original languageEnglish
JournalPhysiological and Molecular Plant Pathology
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Jun 1 2015

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Plant Viruses
plant viruses
Plant Cells
Reactive Oxygen Species
Oxidative Stress
oxidative stress
Viruses
reactive oxygen species
viruses
infection
Virus Diseases
Virus Replication
death
Infection
pathogens
hypersensitive response
cells
virus replication
Antioxidants
signs and symptoms (plants)

Keywords

  • Antioxidative metabolism
  • Compatible interactions
  • Incompatible interactions
  • Oxidative stress
  • Reactive oxygen species

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science
  • Genetics

Cite this

Hernández, J. A., Gullner, G., Clemente-Moreno, M. J., Künstler, A., Juhász, C., Díaz-Vivancos, P., & Király, L. (Accepted/In press). Oxidative stress and antioxidative responses in plant-virus interactions. Physiological and Molecular Plant Pathology. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pmpp.2015.09.001

Oxidative stress and antioxidative responses in plant-virus interactions. / Hernández, José Antonio; Gullner, G.; Clemente-Moreno, María José; Künstler, András; Juhász, Csilla; Díaz-Vivancos, Pedro; Király, Lóránt.

In: Physiological and Molecular Plant Pathology, 01.06.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hernández, José Antonio ; Gullner, G. ; Clemente-Moreno, María José ; Künstler, András ; Juhász, Csilla ; Díaz-Vivancos, Pedro ; Király, Lóránt. / Oxidative stress and antioxidative responses in plant-virus interactions. In: Physiological and Molecular Plant Pathology. 2015.
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