Overrepresentation of BclI polymorphism of the glucocorticoid receptor gene in pregnant women with HELLP syndrome

Rita Bertalan, A. Patócs, B. Nagy, Zoltan Derzsy, Nora Gullai, Agnes Szappanos, J. Rigó, K. Rácz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Because the pathological background of preeclampsia and its severe variant, HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet counts) appears to involve a pathological maternal-fetal immune adaptation, we examined whether any association could exist between these disorders and polymorphisms of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene. Methods: The BclI, N363S, and ER22/23EK polymorphisms of the GR gene were determined in 300 healthy pregnant women, 150 pregnant women with severe preeclampsia including 17 pregnant women with HELLP syndrome. Results: There were no significant differences in carrier and allelic frequencies of the N363S and ER22/23EK polymorphisms between healthy pregnant women and those with severe preeclampsia. However, the allelic and carrier frequencies of the BclI polymorphism were significantly higher in women with HELLP syndrome compared to healthy pregnant women (p = 0.004; Odds ratio, 2.89) and to those with severe preeclampsia (p = 0.013; Odds ratio, 2.56). Conclusion: Our observations suggest that among pregnant women, the BclI polymorphism is associated with the development of HELLP syndrome, but not that of severe preeclampsia. Since preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome develop exclusively in human, it seems particularly interesting that alignment analysis of DNA sequences obtained from databases indicated the absence of the BclI site in 6 animal vertebral species.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)148-152
Number of pages5
JournalClinica Chimica Acta
Volume405
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2009

Fingerprint

HELLP Syndrome
Glucocorticoid Receptors
Pre-Eclampsia
Polymorphism
Pregnant Women
Genes
Odds Ratio
DNA sequences
Platelets
Liver
Nucleic Acid Databases
Hemolysis
Platelet Count
Animals
Mothers
Enzymes

Keywords

  • BclI polymorphism
  • Glucocorticoid receptor gene
  • HELLP syndrome
  • Preeclampsia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry, medical

Cite this

Overrepresentation of BclI polymorphism of the glucocorticoid receptor gene in pregnant women with HELLP syndrome. / Bertalan, Rita; Patócs, A.; Nagy, B.; Derzsy, Zoltan; Gullai, Nora; Szappanos, Agnes; Rigó, J.; Rácz, K.

In: Clinica Chimica Acta, Vol. 405, No. 1-2, 07.2009, p. 148-152.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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