Overproduction of an Arabidopsis aldo-keto reductase increases barley tolerance to oxidative and cadmium stress by an in vivo reactive aldehyde detoxification

Csaba Éva, Gábor Tóth, Mária Oszvald, L. Tamás

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this work, we expressed an Arabidopsis thaliana-coded protein (AKR4C9) in transgenic barley to study its enzymatic activity and to enhance the reactive aldehyde neutralizing capacity (part of the oxidative stress tolerance) of transgenic plants. Total leaf protein was extracted from transgenic plants expressing either C or N-terminally His-tagged aldo-keto reductase (AKR) enzyme and purified by affinity chromatography. The Arabidopsis-coded enzyme showed moderate activity against the synthetic reactive aldehyde, glutaraldehyde, and low but detectable enzyme activity against fructose with a low Michaelis-Menten constant (Km value). Activity of the C and the N-terminally His-tagged AKRs were found to be in the same range. Glutaraldehyde was also tested in vivo by spraying onto the leaves of the plants. The reactive aldehyde tolerance of both wild type and transgenic plants, as well as the general physiological effects of this reactive aldehyde treatment were evaluated. The growth rate was found to decrease in all (both wild type and transgenic) plants. The high AKR-expressing transgenic plants showed a lower respiratory rate, and they also showed higher fresh weight, higher chlorophyll content and photosynthetic activity, indicating a higher reactive aldehyde tolerance. Cadmium (Cd) treatment was also performed to validate this result. Cd caused strong lipid peroxidation; however, the Arabidopsis enzyme lowered the reactive aldehyde content as expected. This is the first report in which kinetic parameters of the fructose reduction by the stress inducible plant AKR enzyme are presented. Furthermore, data on the effects of a reactive aldehyde treatment on intact plants are also provided.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)55-63
Number of pages9
JournalPlant Growth Regulation
Volume74
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Hordeum
Cadmium
Arabidopsis
Aldehydes
aldehydes
cadmium
Genetically Modified Plants
Oxidative Stress
barley
transgenic plants
Enzymes
glutaraldehyde
Glutaral
enzymes
Fructose
fructose
Arabidopsis Proteins
Plant Leaves
leaf protein
Chlorophyll

Keywords

  • Fructose
  • Glutaraldehyde
  • Lipid peroxidation
  • Transgenic plant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science
  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Physiology

Cite this

Overproduction of an Arabidopsis aldo-keto reductase increases barley tolerance to oxidative and cadmium stress by an in vivo reactive aldehyde detoxification. / Éva, Csaba; Tóth, Gábor; Oszvald, Mária; Tamás, L.

In: Plant Growth Regulation, Vol. 74, No. 1, 2014, p. 55-63.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{adc65c9c831f40b88a23a056b6999235,
title = "Overproduction of an Arabidopsis aldo-keto reductase increases barley tolerance to oxidative and cadmium stress by an in vivo reactive aldehyde detoxification",
abstract = "In this work, we expressed an Arabidopsis thaliana-coded protein (AKR4C9) in transgenic barley to study its enzymatic activity and to enhance the reactive aldehyde neutralizing capacity (part of the oxidative stress tolerance) of transgenic plants. Total leaf protein was extracted from transgenic plants expressing either C or N-terminally His-tagged aldo-keto reductase (AKR) enzyme and purified by affinity chromatography. The Arabidopsis-coded enzyme showed moderate activity against the synthetic reactive aldehyde, glutaraldehyde, and low but detectable enzyme activity against fructose with a low Michaelis-Menten constant (Km value). Activity of the C and the N-terminally His-tagged AKRs were found to be in the same range. Glutaraldehyde was also tested in vivo by spraying onto the leaves of the plants. The reactive aldehyde tolerance of both wild type and transgenic plants, as well as the general physiological effects of this reactive aldehyde treatment were evaluated. The growth rate was found to decrease in all (both wild type and transgenic) plants. The high AKR-expressing transgenic plants showed a lower respiratory rate, and they also showed higher fresh weight, higher chlorophyll content and photosynthetic activity, indicating a higher reactive aldehyde tolerance. Cadmium (Cd) treatment was also performed to validate this result. Cd caused strong lipid peroxidation; however, the Arabidopsis enzyme lowered the reactive aldehyde content as expected. This is the first report in which kinetic parameters of the fructose reduction by the stress inducible plant AKR enzyme are presented. Furthermore, data on the effects of a reactive aldehyde treatment on intact plants are also provided.",
keywords = "Fructose, Glutaraldehyde, Lipid peroxidation, Transgenic plant",
author = "Csaba {\'E}va and G{\'a}bor T{\'o}th and M{\'a}ria Oszvald and L. Tam{\'a}s",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1007/s10725-014-9896-x",
language = "English",
volume = "74",
pages = "55--63",
journal = "Plant Growth Regulation",
issn = "0167-6903",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Overproduction of an Arabidopsis aldo-keto reductase increases barley tolerance to oxidative and cadmium stress by an in vivo reactive aldehyde detoxification

AU - Éva, Csaba

AU - Tóth, Gábor

AU - Oszvald, Mária

AU - Tamás, L.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - In this work, we expressed an Arabidopsis thaliana-coded protein (AKR4C9) in transgenic barley to study its enzymatic activity and to enhance the reactive aldehyde neutralizing capacity (part of the oxidative stress tolerance) of transgenic plants. Total leaf protein was extracted from transgenic plants expressing either C or N-terminally His-tagged aldo-keto reductase (AKR) enzyme and purified by affinity chromatography. The Arabidopsis-coded enzyme showed moderate activity against the synthetic reactive aldehyde, glutaraldehyde, and low but detectable enzyme activity against fructose with a low Michaelis-Menten constant (Km value). Activity of the C and the N-terminally His-tagged AKRs were found to be in the same range. Glutaraldehyde was also tested in vivo by spraying onto the leaves of the plants. The reactive aldehyde tolerance of both wild type and transgenic plants, as well as the general physiological effects of this reactive aldehyde treatment were evaluated. The growth rate was found to decrease in all (both wild type and transgenic) plants. The high AKR-expressing transgenic plants showed a lower respiratory rate, and they also showed higher fresh weight, higher chlorophyll content and photosynthetic activity, indicating a higher reactive aldehyde tolerance. Cadmium (Cd) treatment was also performed to validate this result. Cd caused strong lipid peroxidation; however, the Arabidopsis enzyme lowered the reactive aldehyde content as expected. This is the first report in which kinetic parameters of the fructose reduction by the stress inducible plant AKR enzyme are presented. Furthermore, data on the effects of a reactive aldehyde treatment on intact plants are also provided.

AB - In this work, we expressed an Arabidopsis thaliana-coded protein (AKR4C9) in transgenic barley to study its enzymatic activity and to enhance the reactive aldehyde neutralizing capacity (part of the oxidative stress tolerance) of transgenic plants. Total leaf protein was extracted from transgenic plants expressing either C or N-terminally His-tagged aldo-keto reductase (AKR) enzyme and purified by affinity chromatography. The Arabidopsis-coded enzyme showed moderate activity against the synthetic reactive aldehyde, glutaraldehyde, and low but detectable enzyme activity against fructose with a low Michaelis-Menten constant (Km value). Activity of the C and the N-terminally His-tagged AKRs were found to be in the same range. Glutaraldehyde was also tested in vivo by spraying onto the leaves of the plants. The reactive aldehyde tolerance of both wild type and transgenic plants, as well as the general physiological effects of this reactive aldehyde treatment were evaluated. The growth rate was found to decrease in all (both wild type and transgenic) plants. The high AKR-expressing transgenic plants showed a lower respiratory rate, and they also showed higher fresh weight, higher chlorophyll content and photosynthetic activity, indicating a higher reactive aldehyde tolerance. Cadmium (Cd) treatment was also performed to validate this result. Cd caused strong lipid peroxidation; however, the Arabidopsis enzyme lowered the reactive aldehyde content as expected. This is the first report in which kinetic parameters of the fructose reduction by the stress inducible plant AKR enzyme are presented. Furthermore, data on the effects of a reactive aldehyde treatment on intact plants are also provided.

KW - Fructose

KW - Glutaraldehyde

KW - Lipid peroxidation

KW - Transgenic plant

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84905264828&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84905264828&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10725-014-9896-x

DO - 10.1007/s10725-014-9896-x

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84905264828

VL - 74

SP - 55

EP - 63

JO - Plant Growth Regulation

JF - Plant Growth Regulation

SN - 0167-6903

IS - 1

ER -