Over-expression of dopamine D2 receptor and inwardly rectifying potassium channel genes in drug-naive schizophrenic peripheral blood lymphocytes as potential diagnostic markers

A. Zvara, G. Szekeres, Z. Janka, János Z. Kelemen, Csongor Cimmer, M. Sántha, L. Puskás

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Schizophrenia is one of the most common neuropsychiatric disorders affecting nearly 1% of the human population. Current diagnosis of schizophrenia is based on complex clinical symptoms. The use of easily detectable peripheral molecular markers could substantially help the diagnosis of psychiatric disorders. Recent studies showed that peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) express subtypes of D1 and D2 subclasses of dopamine receptors. Recently, dopamine receptor D3(DRD3) was found to be over-expressed in schizophrenic PBL and proposed to be a diagnostic and follow-up marker for schizophrenia. In this study we screened PBL of 13 drug-naive/drug-free schizophrenic patients to identify additional markers of schizophrenia. One of the benefits of our study is the use of blood samples of non-medicated, drug-naive patients. This excludes the possibility that changes detected in gene expression levels might be attributed to the medication rather than to the disorder itself. Among others, genes for dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2) and the inwardly rectifying potassium channel (Kir2.3) were found to be over-expressed in microarray analysis. Increased mRNA levels were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR) using the SybrGreen method and dual labeled TaqMan probes. The use of both molecular markers allows a more rapid and precise prediction of schizophrenia and might help find the optimal medication for schizophrenic patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)61-69
Number of pages9
JournalDisease Markers
Volume21
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Fingerprint

Inwardly Rectifying Potassium Channel
Lymphocytes
Dopamine Receptors
Dopamine
Schizophrenia
Blood
Genes
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Dopamine D3 Receptors
Microarrays
Gene expression
Microarray Analysis
Mental Disorders
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Messenger RNA
Gene Expression
Population

Keywords

  • Dopamine receptor D (DRD2)
  • Inwardly rectifying potassium channel (Kir2.3)
  • Lymphocyte
  • Microarray
  • Real-time PCR
  • Schizophrenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

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title = "Over-expression of dopamine D2 receptor and inwardly rectifying potassium channel genes in drug-naive schizophrenic peripheral blood lymphocytes as potential diagnostic markers",
abstract = "Schizophrenia is one of the most common neuropsychiatric disorders affecting nearly 1{\%} of the human population. Current diagnosis of schizophrenia is based on complex clinical symptoms. The use of easily detectable peripheral molecular markers could substantially help the diagnosis of psychiatric disorders. Recent studies showed that peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) express subtypes of D1 and D2 subclasses of dopamine receptors. Recently, dopamine receptor D3(DRD3) was found to be over-expressed in schizophrenic PBL and proposed to be a diagnostic and follow-up marker for schizophrenia. In this study we screened PBL of 13 drug-naive/drug-free schizophrenic patients to identify additional markers of schizophrenia. One of the benefits of our study is the use of blood samples of non-medicated, drug-naive patients. This excludes the possibility that changes detected in gene expression levels might be attributed to the medication rather than to the disorder itself. Among others, genes for dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2) and the inwardly rectifying potassium channel (Kir2.3) were found to be over-expressed in microarray analysis. Increased mRNA levels were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR) using the SybrGreen method and dual labeled TaqMan probes. The use of both molecular markers allows a more rapid and precise prediction of schizophrenia and might help find the optimal medication for schizophrenic patients.",
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AU - Szekeres, G.

AU - Janka, Z.

AU - Kelemen, János Z.

AU - Cimmer, Csongor

AU - Sántha, M.

AU - Puskás, L.

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