Ovarian steroid cell tumor and a contralateral ovarian thecoma in a postmenopausal woman with severe hyperandrogenism

E. Cserepes, N. Szücs, P. Patkós, Z. Csapó, F. Molnár, M. Tóth, G. Dabasi, O. Ésik, K. Rácz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A 49-year-old woman presented with rapidly progressing hirsutism, receding hairline, male-pattern baldness and deepening of voice, which had developed over the past 2 years. Hormonal evaluation showed a markedly elevated serum testosterone level (418 ng/dl) and no evidence of increased production of cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate, androstenedione, or 17-hydroxyprogesterone. Transvaginal ultrasound examination suggested the presence of a small mass within the left ovary, but all other radiological studies, including adrenal and ovarian computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, radio-labelled cholesterol scintigraphy and positron emission tomography, were negative. Subsequently, bilateral selective venous sampling showed a marked testosterone gradient in the right ovarian vein. Bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy was performed (the patient had had a previous vaginal hysterectomy), and histopathological examination revealed a 10-mm steroid cell tumor within the right ovary and a 15-mm thecal cell tumor within the left ovary. The postoperative serum testosterone level returned to normal and the patient showed a slow regression of clinical symptoms. The simultaneous occurrence of a virilizing ovarian steroid cell tumor and an apparently non-functioning thecoma within the contralateral ovary emphasizes the potential pitfalls that may exist in the preoperative evaluation of patients with markedly increased testosterone production.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)213-216
Number of pages4
JournalGynecological Endocrinology
Volume16
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Thecoma
Hyperandrogenism
Testosterone
Ovary
Steroids
Neoplasms
17-alpha-Hydroxyprogesterone
Vaginal Hysterectomy
Hirsutism
Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate
Dehydroepiandrosterone
Androstenedione
Alopecia
Ovariectomy
Serum
Radio
Radionuclide Imaging
Positron-Emission Tomography
Hydrocortisone
Veins

Keywords

  • Hyperandrogenism
  • Leydig cell tumor
  • Ovarian thecoma
  • Steroid cell tumor
  • Testosterone
  • Virilizing ovarian tumor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Cite this

Ovarian steroid cell tumor and a contralateral ovarian thecoma in a postmenopausal woman with severe hyperandrogenism. / Cserepes, E.; Szücs, N.; Patkós, P.; Csapó, Z.; Molnár, F.; Tóth, M.; Dabasi, G.; Ésik, O.; Rácz, K.

In: Gynecological Endocrinology, Vol. 16, No. 3, 2002, p. 213-216.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cserepes, E. ; Szücs, N. ; Patkós, P. ; Csapó, Z. ; Molnár, F. ; Tóth, M. ; Dabasi, G. ; Ésik, O. ; Rácz, K. / Ovarian steroid cell tumor and a contralateral ovarian thecoma in a postmenopausal woman with severe hyperandrogenism. In: Gynecological Endocrinology. 2002 ; Vol. 16, No. 3. pp. 213-216.
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