Otilonium bromide enhances sensory thresholds of volume and pressure in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

József Czimmer, Gábor Süto, Agnes Király, Gyula Mózsik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Visceral hyperalgesia has been suggested to play a role in the development of symptoms presented by irritable bowel syndrome patients. Otilonium bromide was developed to block smooth muscle Ca release to control cramping pain of these patients. Aims: to determine whether otilonium bromide can influence sensory thresholds of patients suffering from irritable bowel syndrome. Methods: 15 patients with Rome-II positive lBS were tested by Synectics Visceral Stimulator Barostat using rapid phasic distension (870 ml/min). The sensory threshold for first sensation, stool, pain and maximum tolerable volume and pressure were measured. All of the parameters were tested before and 1 week after the initiation of otilonium bromide (Spasmomen, Berlin Chemie, 3×40 mg) therapy. Results: The perceptual thresholds for first sensation, stool, pain and maximum tolerable distention were, 8.8±1.7 Hgmm, 19.2±2.1 Hgmm, 26.3±2.8 Hgmm, 28.7±2.8 Hgmm for pressure, 90±21 ml, 145±28 ml, 208±25 ml, 213±28 ml for volume, before treatment, respectively. Otilonium bromide treatment did not influence the thresholds for first sensation and stool, 7.4±1.4 Hgmm, 20.7±4.6 Hgmm and 83±21 ml, 178±35.8 ml, respectively. The pressure threshold of pain was significantly higher 1 week after treatment (26.3±2.8 Hgmm vs. 29.1±5.5 Hgmm, P < 0.05), but the volume threshold of this sensation remained unchanged (208±25 ml vs. 234±39 ml, not significant). The pressure (28.7±2.8 Hgmm vs. 38.1±3.4 Hgmm, P < 0.05) and volume (213±28 ml vs. 278±27ml, P < 0.05) thresholds for maximum tolerable volume were increased by 7 days otilonium bromide treatment. Conclusion: These data suggest that otilonium bromide enhances sensory thresholds to recto-sigmoideal distention.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)153-156
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Physiology Paris
Volume95
Issue number1-6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 12 2001

    Fingerprint

Keywords

  • Irritable bowel syndrome
  • Otilonium bromide
  • Visceral hypersensitivity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this