Oscillatory activity in the infant brain reflects object maintenance

Jordy Kaufman, G. Csibra, Mark H. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The apparent failure of infants to understand "object permanence" by reaching for hidden objects is perhaps the most striking and debated phenomenon in cognitive development. Of particular interest is the extent to which infants perceive and remember objects in a similar way to that of adults. Here we report two findings that clarify infant object processing. The first is that 6-mo-old infants are sensitive to visual cues to occlusion, particularly gradual deletion. The second finding is that oscillatory electroencephalogram activity recorded over right temporal channels is involved in object maintenance. This effect occurs only after disappearance in a manner consistent with occlusion and the object's continued existence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)15271-15274
Number of pages4
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume102
Issue number42
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 18 2005

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Maintenance
Brain
Cues
Electroencephalography

Keywords

  • Electroencephalogram
  • Gamma oscillations
  • Infancy
  • Object permanence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • General

Cite this

Oscillatory activity in the infant brain reflects object maintenance. / Kaufman, Jordy; Csibra, G.; Johnson, Mark H.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 102, No. 42, 18.10.2005, p. 15271-15274.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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