Origin and taxonomy of wheat in the light of recent research

A. F. Bálint, G. Kovács, J. Sutka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is still disagreement among scientists on the exact origin of common wheat (Triticum aestivum ssp. aestivum), one of the most important crops in the world. The first step in the development of the hexaploid aestivum group (ABD) may have been hybridisation between T. urartu (A), as pollinator, and a species related to the Sitopsis section of the Aegilops genus (S) as cytoplasm donor, leading to the creation of the tetraploid species T. turgidum ssp. dicoccoides (AB). The following step may have involved hybridisation between T. turgidum ssp. dicoccon (AB genome, cytoplasm donor), a descendant of T. turgidum ssp. dicoccoides, and Ae. tauschii (D genome, pollinator), resulting in the hexaploid species T. aestivum ssp. spelta (ABD) or some other hulled type. This form may have given rise to naked types, including T. aestivum ssp. aestivum (ABD). The ancestors of the tetraploid T. timopheevii (AG) may have been the diploid T. urartu (A genome, pollinator) and Ae. speltoides (S genome, cytoplasm donor). Species in the timopheevii group developed later than those in the turgidum group, as confirmed by the fact that the G genome is practically identical to the S genome of Ae. speltoides, while the more ancient B genome has undergone divergent evolution. Hybridisation between T. timopheevii (AG, cytoplasm donor) and T. monococcum (Am, pollinator) may have resulted in the species T. zhukovskyi (AGAm). Research into the relationships between the various species is of assistance in compiling the taxonomy of wheat and in avoiding misunderstandings arising from the fact that some species are known by two or more synonymous names.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)301-313
Number of pages13
JournalActa Agronomica Hungarica
Volume48
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000

Fingerprint

taxonomy
wheat
genome
pollinators
cytoplasm
Aegilops
Triticum aestivum
hybridization
hexaploidy
tetraploidy
divergent evolution
Triticum
ancestry
diploidy
crops

Keywords

  • Aegilops
  • Evolution
  • Genomic constitution
  • Taxonomy
  • Triticum
  • Wheat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science

Cite this

Origin and taxonomy of wheat in the light of recent research. / Bálint, A. F.; Kovács, G.; Sutka, J.

In: Acta Agronomica Hungarica, Vol. 48, No. 3, 2000, p. 301-313.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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