Organization of the hypoglossal nucleus in the frog, rana esculenta

C. Matesz, Andras Birinyi, Éva Rácz, György Székely, Tímea Bácskai

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The tongue and the hypoglossal motoneurons innervating the tongue muscles are important elements of the prey-catching behavior. Functionally, the tongue muscles comprise the protractor, the retractor and inner groups. Retrograde labeling of the hypoglossal motoneurons of the frog revealed a dorsomedial, a ventrolateral and an intermediate subnucleus within the hypoglossal nucleus. Labeling of nerves innervating the individual muscles showed a musculotopic organization of the motoneurons in the three subnuclei. In the dorsomedial subnucleus, the neurons displayed oval or round perikarya, the dendritic tree extends in mediolateral direction and many of the medial dendrites decussate to the contralateral side. In the intermediate and the ventrolateral subnuclei larger neurons with polygonal perikarya and various dendritic trees with contralateral branches appeared. The qualitative differences in the perikaryon and dendritic arborization of the individual motoneurons suggested that these differences could be associated with a specific function. To test this hypothesis, each reconstructed motoneuron was characterized by quantitative parameters describing the size of the perikaryon and dendritic tree and the shape and orientation of the dendritic arbor. The multivariant discriminant analysis showed correlation between form and function of these motoneurons indicating that characteristic geometry of the dendritic tree may have a preference for one array of fibers over another. This finding was strengthened by different topographical organization and morphology of last-order premotor interneurons supplying protractor and retractor muscles of the tongue. By using confocal laser scanning microscope and electron microscope we have found that the crossing dendrites of hypoglossal motoneurons make dendrodendritic and dendrosomatic contacts with the contralateral hypoglossal motoneurons providing one of the morphological substrates for functional interactions between tongue motoneurons located on different sides of the brainstem. The large number of contacts between the bilateral hypoglossal motoneurons offers the possibility of co-activation, synchronization and timing of the bilateral activity of tongue muscles during the prey-catching behavior of the frog. The crossing dendrites may also provide a feedforward amplification of signals arriving from various sources to the hypoglossal motoneurons.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationTongue: Anatomy, Kinematics and Diseases
PublisherNova Science Publishers, Inc.
Pages179-190
Number of pages12
ISBN (Print)9781621006282
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2012

Fingerprint

Rana esculenta
Motor Neurons
Anura
Tongue
Muscles
Dendrites
Neurons
Neuronal Plasticity
Discriminant Analysis
Interneurons
Brain Stem
Lasers

Keywords

  • Brainstem motoneurons
  • Multivariate statistics
  • Neuronal labeling
  • Tongue motoneurons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Matesz, C., Birinyi, A., Rácz, É., Székely, G., & Bácskai, T. (2012). Organization of the hypoglossal nucleus in the frog, rana esculenta. In Tongue: Anatomy, Kinematics and Diseases (pp. 179-190). Nova Science Publishers, Inc..

Organization of the hypoglossal nucleus in the frog, rana esculenta. / Matesz, C.; Birinyi, Andras; Rácz, Éva; Székely, György; Bácskai, Tímea.

Tongue: Anatomy, Kinematics and Diseases. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2012. p. 179-190.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Matesz, C, Birinyi, A, Rácz, É, Székely, G & Bácskai, T 2012, Organization of the hypoglossal nucleus in the frog, rana esculenta. in Tongue: Anatomy, Kinematics and Diseases. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., pp. 179-190.
Matesz C, Birinyi A, Rácz É, Székely G, Bácskai T. Organization of the hypoglossal nucleus in the frog, rana esculenta. In Tongue: Anatomy, Kinematics and Diseases. Nova Science Publishers, Inc. 2012. p. 179-190
Matesz, C. ; Birinyi, Andras ; Rácz, Éva ; Székely, György ; Bácskai, Tímea. / Organization of the hypoglossal nucleus in the frog, rana esculenta. Tongue: Anatomy, Kinematics and Diseases. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2012. pp. 179-190
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