Organic acids

Christian P. Kubicek, L. Karaffa

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Various organic acids are accumulated by several eukaryotic and prokaryotic micro-organisms. In anaerobic bacteria, their formation is usually a means by which these organisms regenerate NADH, and their accumulation therefore strictly parallels growth (e.g. lactic acid, propionic acid, etc; see Chapter 2). In aerobic bacteria and fungi, in contrast, the accumulation of organic acids is the result of incomplete substrate oxidation and is usually initiated by an imbalance in some essential nutrients, e.g. mineral ions. Despite the completely different physiological prerequisites for the formation of these products, no distinction will be made between these two types of products in this chapter. The organic acids described below are those that are manufactured in large volumes (see Table 15.1), and marketed as relatively pure chemicals or their salts.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationBasic Biotechnology: Third Edition
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages359-380
Number of pages22
ISBN (Print)9780511802409, 9780521840316
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2006

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Organic acids
Acids
Aerobic bacteria
Aerobic Bacteria
Anaerobic Bacteria
Fungi
NAD
Nutrients
Minerals
Lactic Acid
Bacteria
Salts
Ions
Food
Oxidation
Substrates
Growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Kubicek, C. P., & Karaffa, L. (2006). Organic acids. In Basic Biotechnology: Third Edition (pp. 359-380). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511802409.017

Organic acids. / Kubicek, Christian P.; Karaffa, L.

Basic Biotechnology: Third Edition. Cambridge University Press, 2006. p. 359-380.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Kubicek, CP & Karaffa, L 2006, Organic acids. in Basic Biotechnology: Third Edition. Cambridge University Press, pp. 359-380. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511802409.017
Kubicek CP, Karaffa L. Organic acids. In Basic Biotechnology: Third Edition. Cambridge University Press. 2006. p. 359-380 https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511802409.017
Kubicek, Christian P. ; Karaffa, L. / Organic acids. Basic Biotechnology: Third Edition. Cambridge University Press, 2006. pp. 359-380
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