Orally given gastroprotective capsaicin does not modify aspirin-induced platelet aggregation in healthy male volunteers (human phase i examination)

B. Sandor, J. Papp, Gy Mozsik, J. Szolcsanyi, Zs Keszthelyi, I. Juricskay, K. Toth, Tamas Habon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Capsaicin is a well-known component of red pepper. Recent studies have shown that capsaicin could prevent gastric ulcer provoked by various NSAID-s like acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). Primary objective of this human clinical phase I trial was to investigate whether two different doses of capsaicin co-administered with ASA could alter the inhibitory effect of ASA on platelet aggregation. 15 healthy male subjects were involved in the study and treated orally with 400 μg capsaicin, 800 μg capsaicin, 500 mg ASA, 400 μg capsaicin+500 mg ASA and 800 μg capsaicin+500 mg ASA. Blood was drawn before and 1, 2, 6 and 24 hours after the drug administration. After that epinephrine induced platelet aggregation was measured by optical aggregometry. Between treatments, volunteers had a 6-day wash-out period. Our results showed that capsaicin had no effect on platelet aggregation, while as expected, ASA monotherapy resulted in a significant and clinically effective platelet aggregation inhibition (p 0.001). The combined ASA-capsaicin therapies reached equivalent effectiveness in platelet aggregation inhibition as ASA monotherapy. Our investigation proved that capsaicin did not influence the inhibitory effect of ASA on platelet aggregation, thus the capsaicin-ASA treatment would combine the antiplatelet effect of ASA with the possible gastroprotection of capsaicin.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)429-437
Number of pages9
JournalActa physiologica Hungarica
Volume101
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2014

Keywords

  • acetylsalicylic acid
  • capsaicin
  • gastric mucosal lesion
  • healthy volunteers
  • platelet aggregation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology (medical)

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