Oral ciprofloxacin vs. intravenous ceftazidime plus tobramycin in pediatric cystic fibrosis patients: Comparison of antipseudomonas efficacy and assessment of safety with ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging

David A. Richard, Sanda Nousia-Arvanitakis, Veronika Sollich, Barbara J. Hampel, Bernd Sommerauer, Urs B. Schaad, A. Sardet, S. Brömme, E. Klöditz, T. Lietz, R. Schille, H. G. Posselt, S. Noll, V. Sollich, T. Zimmermann, H. Bärmeier-Wasmuth, U. Wahn, A. Weber, K. Magdorf, F. WackerJ. Tröger, M. Lyle, A. Schmidt, I. Preuss, C. Krasemann, P. Nikolaidis, A. Peonides, S. Skalidopoulos, G. Sotiriadis, K. Gyurkovits, K. Bolbas, J. Rivlin, G. Mastella, M. Cipolli, P. Trogu, C. Barreto, E. Lara, J. Egner, M. Hauptmann, J. Wedgwood

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Abstract

Background. More data on the efficacy and safety of ciprofloxacin in pediatric cystic fibrosis patients are needed. Methods. One hundred eight pediatric cystic fibrosis patients (ages 5 to 17 years) with acute bronchopulmonary exacerbations entered a randomized multicenter trial designed to compare the safety and efficacy of antipseudomonas therapy with oral ciprofloxacin (15 mg/kg twice daily; maximum dosage 750 mg twice daily) or intravenous ceftazidime plus tobramycin (CAZ/TM) for 14 days. Results. Clinical improvement was observed in 93% of patients treated with oral ciprofloxacin and in 96% of those receiving parenteral therapy. Transient suppression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was achieved in 63% of patients at the end of the course of iv CAZ/TM therapy and in 24% receiving ciprofloxacin. Ultrasound examination and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging scans showed no evidence of cartilage toxicity in any of the ciprofloxacin-treated patients. Musculoskeletal adverse events were reported with similar frequency in the two groups of patients (7% in the group receiving ciprofloxacin therapy and 11% in the IV CAZ/TM group). The only sustained musculoskeletal symptom was a case of synovitis in a patient receiving parenteral CAZ/TM. Conclusion. Ciprofloxacin thus appears to be safe and effective for use in young patients with bronchopulmonary exacerbation of cystic fibrosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)572-578
Number of pages7
JournalPediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Volume16
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 1997

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Keywords

  • Antipseudomonas
  • Ciprofloxacin
  • Cystic fibrosis
  • Pediatrics
  • Skeletal toxicity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Richard, D. A., Nousia-Arvanitakis, S., Sollich, V., Hampel, B. J., Sommerauer, B., Schaad, U. B., Sardet, A., Brömme, S., Klöditz, E., Lietz, T., Schille, R., Posselt, H. G., Noll, S., Sollich, V., Zimmermann, T., Bärmeier-Wasmuth, H., Wahn, U., Weber, A., Magdorf, K., ... Wedgwood, J. (1997). Oral ciprofloxacin vs. intravenous ceftazidime plus tobramycin in pediatric cystic fibrosis patients: Comparison of antipseudomonas efficacy and assessment of safety with ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, 16(6), 572-578. https://doi.org/10.1097/00006454-199706000-00007