Optimal fuzzy rule bases - the cat and mouse problem

L. Kóczy, A. Zorat

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Approximate fuzzy rule-based models are more precise if their size is bigger. A larger model, however, requires more time for its evaluation and hence the problem arises of finding a compromise between size and accuracy for the task at hand. This trade-off between computation time and precision is mapped into the problem of tracking a moving target: higher accuracy results in a tighter precision of the target location, but at the cost of longer computation time, during which the target can move further away, thus ultimately requiring a longer search time for target localization. This paper examines the problem of determining the optimal rule-base size that will yield a minimum total time required to repeatedly re-acquire a moving target, as done by a cat that plays with a mouse. The general problem has no known solution: here solutions of specific cases will be presented.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIEEE International Conference on Fuzzy Systems
Editors Anon
PublisherIEEE
Pages1865-1870
Number of pages6
Volume3
Publication statusPublished - 1996
EventProceedings of the 1996 5th IEEE International Conference on Fuzzy Systems. Part 3 (of 3) - New Orleans, LA, USA
Duration: Sep 8 1996Sep 11 1996

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1996 5th IEEE International Conference on Fuzzy Systems. Part 3 (of 3)
CityNew Orleans, LA, USA
Period9/8/969/11/96

Fingerprint

Fuzzy rules

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Health and Safety
  • Software
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality

Cite this

Kóczy, L., & Zorat, A. (1996). Optimal fuzzy rule bases - the cat and mouse problem. In Anon (Ed.), IEEE International Conference on Fuzzy Systems (Vol. 3, pp. 1865-1870). IEEE.

Optimal fuzzy rule bases - the cat and mouse problem. / Kóczy, L.; Zorat, A.

IEEE International Conference on Fuzzy Systems. ed. / Anon. Vol. 3 IEEE, 1996. p. 1865-1870.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Kóczy, L & Zorat, A 1996, Optimal fuzzy rule bases - the cat and mouse problem. in Anon (ed.), IEEE International Conference on Fuzzy Systems. vol. 3, IEEE, pp. 1865-1870, Proceedings of the 1996 5th IEEE International Conference on Fuzzy Systems. Part 3 (of 3), New Orleans, LA, USA, 9/8/96.
Kóczy L, Zorat A. Optimal fuzzy rule bases - the cat and mouse problem. In Anon, editor, IEEE International Conference on Fuzzy Systems. Vol. 3. IEEE. 1996. p. 1865-1870
Kóczy, L. ; Zorat, A. / Optimal fuzzy rule bases - the cat and mouse problem. IEEE International Conference on Fuzzy Systems. editor / Anon. Vol. 3 IEEE, 1996. pp. 1865-1870
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