Onset of bioconvection in suspensions of Bacillus subtilis

I. Jánosi, John O. Kessler, Viktor K. Horváth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bioconvection occurs when upward swimming micro-organisms generate gravitational energy that initiates and maintains dissipative movement of the water in which they swim. Advection, and motion of the organisms relative to the fluid, generate patchiness in concentration that drives and shapes the geometry and rate of convection. This paper presents a method for quantitatively analyzing the development of self-organization, and numerical estimates that connect and interpret theory and experiment. While the oxygen consuming, oxgen-gradient-guided bacteria Bacillus subtilis are the sole subject here, the methods developed will find application to the analysis and modeling of other complex dynamic systems that ineluctably combine physics and biology.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4793-4800
Number of pages8
JournalPhysical Review E - Statistical Physics, Plasmas, Fluids, and Related Interdisciplinary Topics
Volume58
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1998

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Bacillus
organisms
Microorganisms
Complex Dynamics
Self-organization
Advection
advection
biology
Bacteria
bacteria
Dynamic Systems
Biology
Convection
Oxygen
Complex Systems
convection
Physics
Gradient
Water
Fluid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mathematical Physics
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Statistical and Nonlinear Physics

Cite this

Onset of bioconvection in suspensions of Bacillus subtilis. / Jánosi, I.; Kessler, John O.; Horváth, Viktor K.

In: Physical Review E - Statistical Physics, Plasmas, Fluids, and Related Interdisciplinary Topics, Vol. 58, No. 4, 1998, p. 4793-4800.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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