Online and offline video game use in adolescents: measurement invariance and problem severity

Máté Smohai, R. Urbán, Mark D. Griffiths, Orsolya Király, Zsuzsanna Mirnics, András Vargha, Zsolt Demetrovics

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Despite the increasing popularity of video game playing, little is known about the similarities and differences between online and offline video game players. Objectives: The aims of this study were (i) to test the applicability and the measurement invariance of the previously developed Problematic Online Gaming Questionnaire (POGQ) in both online and offline gamers and to (ii) examine the differences in these groups. Methods: Video game use habits and POGQ were assessed in a sample of 1,964 (71% male) adolescent videogame players. Those gamers who played at least sometimes in an online context were considered “online gamers,” while those who played videogames exclusively offline were considered “offline gamers.” Results: Confirmatory factor analysis supported the measurement invariance across online and offline videogame players. According to the multiple indicators multiple causes (MIMIC) model, online gamers were more likely to score higher on overuse, interpersonal conflict, and social isolation subscales of the POGQ. Conclusion: The results of the present study suggest that online and offline gaming can be assessed using the same psychometric instrument. These findings open the possibility for future research studies concerning problematic video gaming to include participants who exclusively play online or offline games, or both. However, the study also identified important structural features about how online and offline gaming might contribute differently to problematic use. These results provide important information that could be utilized in parental education and the prevention program about the possible detrimental consequences of online vs. offline video gaming.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)111-116
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse
Volume43
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2 2017

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Video Games
Social Isolation
Psychometrics
Statistical Factor Analysis
Habits
Education
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Measurement invariance
  • MIMIC model
  • offline video games
  • online video games
  • problem severity
  • problematic video game use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Online and offline video game use in adolescents : measurement invariance and problem severity. / Smohai, Máté; Urbán, R.; Griffiths, Mark D.; Király, Orsolya; Mirnics, Zsuzsanna; Vargha, András; Demetrovics, Zsolt.

In: American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, Vol. 43, No. 1, 02.01.2017, p. 111-116.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Smohai, Máté ; Urbán, R. ; Griffiths, Mark D. ; Király, Orsolya ; Mirnics, Zsuzsanna ; Vargha, András ; Demetrovics, Zsolt. / Online and offline video game use in adolescents : measurement invariance and problem severity. In: American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse. 2017 ; Vol. 43, No. 1. pp. 111-116.
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