On the spontaneous ultraweak light emission of plants

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Products and byproducts of the metabolism of plant cell organelles can initiate reactions which result in radical formation. These highly active compounds are capable of emitting light or transferring excitation. If chlorophyll is present, it will probably receive excitation from the radicals and act as an emitter itself, resulting in apparently spontaneous light emission from dark-adapted plants. Spectral and kinetic data suggest that this phenomenon is different from fluorescence or delayed light emission. The aim of this work is to review new developments in the study of spontaneous ultraweak light emission from plant tissues, in particular recent evidence linking metabolic pathways to dark photoemission.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)239-244
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Photochemistry and Photobiology, B: Biology
Volume18
Issue number2-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1993

Fingerprint

Spontaneous emission
Light emission
spontaneous emission
light emission
Light
organelles
Photoemission
chlorophylls
metabolism
Chlorophyll
Metabolism
excitation
Byproducts
Plant Cells
emitters
photoelectric emission
Metabolic Networks and Pathways
Fluorescence
Organelles
Tissue

Keywords

  • Chloroplast
  • Dark photoemission
  • Electron transport
  • Emission spectrum
  • Mitochondria
  • Peroxisomes
  • Ultraweak light

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science
  • Bioengineering
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Cite this

On the spontaneous ultraweak light emission of plants. / Hideg, É.

In: Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology, B: Biology, Vol. 18, No. 2-3, 1993, p. 239-244.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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