On the Role of Na,K-ATPase: A Challenge for the Membrane-Pump and Association-Induction Hypotheses

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Abstract

The regulation of cellular ion levels has been an important issue of cell physiology since the beginning of the century. A special interest was focused on the monovalent ions which are involved in several cellular functions; in fact, the maintenance of high K+ level inside the cells is one of the most basic life-phenomena. Regarding the regulation of monovalent ions in general, two opposing ideas emerged: one being the membrane theory and the other the sorption theory(ies). Today most scientists are familiar only with the membrane theory which involves the pump and leak hypothesis and only a few consider the predictions of the association-induction hypothesis which may be classified as one of the sorption theories. In the regulation of monovalent ions the Na,K-ATPase is a key-molecule according to the membrane theory but not considered that important by the association-induction hypothesis. In this paper, we present two simple experiments which demonstrate the possible role of this molecule in the regulation of cellular Na+, K+ homeostasis and also disprove the pump and leak hypothesis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)81-87
Number of pages7
JournalPhysiological Chemistry and Physics and Medical NMR
Volume30
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1998

Fingerprint

Adenosine Triphosphatases
Pumps
Ions
Membranes
Sorption
Cell Physiological Phenomena
Molecules
Physiology
Homeostasis
sodium-translocating ATPase
Experiments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Biochemistry
  • Biophysics
  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

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abstract = "The regulation of cellular ion levels has been an important issue of cell physiology since the beginning of the century. A special interest was focused on the monovalent ions which are involved in several cellular functions; in fact, the maintenance of high K+ level inside the cells is one of the most basic life-phenomena. Regarding the regulation of monovalent ions in general, two opposing ideas emerged: one being the membrane theory and the other the sorption theory(ies). Today most scientists are familiar only with the membrane theory which involves the pump and leak hypothesis and only a few consider the predictions of the association-induction hypothesis which may be classified as one of the sorption theories. In the regulation of monovalent ions the Na,K-ATPase is a key-molecule according to the membrane theory but not considered that important by the association-induction hypothesis. In this paper, we present two simple experiments which demonstrate the possible role of this molecule in the regulation of cellular Na+, K+ homeostasis and also disprove the pump and leak hypothesis.",
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AU - Miseta, A.

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