On the origin of microembolic signals: A clinical and postmortem study

Gernot Schulte-Altedorneburg, Eun Mi Nam, Martin Ritter, M. Magyar, Ralf Dittrich, L. Csiba, E. Bernd Ringelstein, Dirk W. Droste

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Purpose: Clinically silent circulating microembolic signals (MES) can be identified by transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD). It is not yet clear whether their occurrence is always linked to the presence of embolic sources. Methods: 24 terminally ill patients (7 women, 17 men; mean age 68 years) were investigated by TCD of the middle cerebral arteries. These findings were correlated with a complete post-mortem examination of potential embolic pathways. Results: Four patients out of the 24 under investigation showed MES, 2 of them bilaterally. All these 4 MES-positive patients had a definite embolic source, i. e. bilateral carotid artery occlusive disease, endocarditis with thrombotic valvular adhesions and severe plaques in the aortic arch, dilated left atrium and a patent foramen ovale, or severe plaques in the aortic arch and a dilated left atrium, respectively. Conclusions: In the investigated patient group, we could demonstrate that MES can only be found when an embolic source is present. The finding of MES justifies an extensive clinical and laboratory search for potential embolic sources including extracranial and intracranial colour-coded duplex ultrasound, ECG, Holter-ECG, and TEE.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1044-1049
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Neurology
Volume250
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2003

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Doppler Ultrasonography
Heart Atria
Thoracic Aorta
Electrocardiography
Patent Foramen Ovale
Terminally Ill
Carotid Artery Diseases
Focal Adhesions
Middle Cerebral Artery
Endocarditis
Autopsy
Color
Clinical Studies

Keywords

  • Cerebral embolism
  • Cerebrovascular disorders
  • Postmortem
  • Ultrasonography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

Schulte-Altedorneburg, G., Nam, E. M., Ritter, M., Magyar, M., Dittrich, R., Csiba, L., ... Droste, D. W. (2003). On the origin of microembolic signals: A clinical and postmortem study. Journal of Neurology, 250(9), 1044-1049. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00415-003-0140-2

On the origin of microembolic signals : A clinical and postmortem study. / Schulte-Altedorneburg, Gernot; Nam, Eun Mi; Ritter, Martin; Magyar, M.; Dittrich, Ralf; Csiba, L.; Ringelstein, E. Bernd; Droste, Dirk W.

In: Journal of Neurology, Vol. 250, No. 9, 01.09.2003, p. 1044-1049.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schulte-Altedorneburg, G, Nam, EM, Ritter, M, Magyar, M, Dittrich, R, Csiba, L, Ringelstein, EB & Droste, DW 2003, 'On the origin of microembolic signals: A clinical and postmortem study', Journal of Neurology, vol. 250, no. 9, pp. 1044-1049. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00415-003-0140-2
Schulte-Altedorneburg, Gernot ; Nam, Eun Mi ; Ritter, Martin ; Magyar, M. ; Dittrich, Ralf ; Csiba, L. ; Ringelstein, E. Bernd ; Droste, Dirk W. / On the origin of microembolic signals : A clinical and postmortem study. In: Journal of Neurology. 2003 ; Vol. 250, No. 9. pp. 1044-1049.
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