On the fly

Recent progress on autophagy and aging in Drosophila

Tamás Maruzs, Zsófia Simon-Vecsei, Viktória Kiss, Tamás Csizmadia, G. Juhász

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Autophagy ensures the lysosome-mediated breakdown and recycling of self-material, as it not only degrades obsolete or damaged intracellular constituents but also provides building blocks for biosynthetic and energy producing reactions. Studies in animal models including Drosophila revealed that autophagy defects lead to the rapid decline of neuromuscular function, neurodegeneration, sensitivity to stress (such as starvation or oxidative damage), and stem cell loss. Of note, recently identified human Atg gene mutations cause similar symptoms including ataxia and mental retardation. Physiologically, autophagic degradation (flux) is known to decrease during aging, and this defect likely contributes to the development of such age-associated diseases. Many manipulations that extend lifespan (including dietary restriction, reduced TOR kinase signaling, exercise or treatment with various anti-aging substances) require autophagy for their beneficial effect on longevity, pointing to the key role of this housekeeping process. Importantly, genetic (e.g., Atg8a overexpression in either neurons or muscle) or pharmacological (e.g., feeding rapamycin or spermidine to animals) promotion of autophagy has been successfully used to extend lifespan in Drosophila, suggesting that this intracellular degradation pathway can rejuvenate cells and organisms. In this review, we highlight key discoveries and recent progress in understanding the relationship of autophagy and aging in Drosophila.

Original languageEnglish
Article number140
JournalFrontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology
Volume7
Issue numberJULY
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Autophagy
Diptera
Drosophila
TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases
Housekeeping
Spermidine
Recycling
Sirolimus
Ataxia
Starvation
Lysosomes
Intellectual Disability
Stem Cells
Animal Models
Pharmacology
Neurons
Muscles
Mutation
Genes

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Autophagy
  • Dietary restriction (DR)
  • Drosophila
  • Spermidine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

On the fly : Recent progress on autophagy and aging in Drosophila. / Maruzs, Tamás; Simon-Vecsei, Zsófia; Kiss, Viktória; Csizmadia, Tamás; Juhász, G.

In: Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology, Vol. 7, No. JULY, 140, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Maruzs, Tamás ; Simon-Vecsei, Zsófia ; Kiss, Viktória ; Csizmadia, Tamás ; Juhász, G. / On the fly : Recent progress on autophagy and aging in Drosophila. In: Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology. 2019 ; Vol. 7, No. JULY.
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