On monitoring and failure localization in mesh all-optical networks

J. Tapolcai, Bin Wu, Pin Han Ho

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Achieving fast and precise failure localization has long been a highly desired feature in all-optical mesh networks. M-trail (monitoring trail) has been proposed as the most general monitoring structure for achieving unambiguous failure localization (UFL) of any single link failure while effectively reducing the amount of alarm signals flooded in the networks. However, it is critical to come up with a fast and intelligent m-trail design approach for minimizing the number of m-trails and the totally consumed bandwidth, which ubiquitously determines the length of alarm code and bandwidth overhead for the mtrail deployment, respectively. In this paper, the m-trail design problem is investigated. To gain deeper understanding of the problem, we firstly conduct a bound analysis on the minimum length of alarm code required for UFL. Then, a novel algorithm based on random code assignment (RCA) and random code swapping (RCS) is developed for solving the m-trail design problem. The algorithm prototype can be found in [1]. The algorithm is verified by comparing with an Integer Linear Program (ILP), and the results demonstrate its superiority in minimizing the fault management cost and bandwidth consumption while achieving significant reduction in computation time. To investigate the impact of topology diversity, extensive simulation is conducted on thousands of random network topologies with systematically increased network connectivity. Lastly, we provide abundant discussions and interesting conclusive remarks that position our discoveries.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings - IEEE INFOCOM
Pages1008-1016
Number of pages9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Event28th Conference on Computer Communications, IEEE INFOCOM 2009 - Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Duration: Apr 19 2009Apr 25 2009

Other

Other28th Conference on Computer Communications, IEEE INFOCOM 2009
CountryBrazil
CityRio de Janeiro
Period4/19/094/25/09

Fingerprint

Fiber optic networks
Bandwidth
Monitoring
Topology
Costs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Tapolcai, J., Wu, B., & Ho, P. H. (2009). On monitoring and failure localization in mesh all-optical networks. In Proceedings - IEEE INFOCOM (pp. 1008-1016). [5062012] https://doi.org/10.1109/INFCOM.2009.5062012

On monitoring and failure localization in mesh all-optical networks. / Tapolcai, J.; Wu, Bin; Ho, Pin Han.

Proceedings - IEEE INFOCOM. 2009. p. 1008-1016 5062012.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Tapolcai, J, Wu, B & Ho, PH 2009, On monitoring and failure localization in mesh all-optical networks. in Proceedings - IEEE INFOCOM., 5062012, pp. 1008-1016, 28th Conference on Computer Communications, IEEE INFOCOM 2009, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 4/19/09. https://doi.org/10.1109/INFCOM.2009.5062012
Tapolcai, J. ; Wu, Bin ; Ho, Pin Han. / On monitoring and failure localization in mesh all-optical networks. Proceedings - IEEE INFOCOM. 2009. pp. 1008-1016
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