On correlation of maize and wheat yield with NDVI: Example of Hungary (1985-1998)

J. Mika, J. Kerényi, A. Rimóczi-Paál, Á Merza, C. Szinell, I. Csiszár

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of the staldy is to quantify statistical relations between the Normalized Differential Vegetation Index (NDVI), derived frona NOAA/AVHRR multi-channel irradiance, and yield of wheat and maize commonly covering 23.5 % of Hungary. The 14 years period, 1985-1998 is used, reserving the later vegetation seasons for independent validation, in the future. The yield reporting units are the 19 administrative counties, characterized by 50-90 km of linear measure and diverse vegetation. Cluster analysis of the yield series is performed to identify possible outliers, but there are no qualitatively separating outliers found among the 14 years and 19 counties for the investigated plants. The same procedure is performed for the average proportion of land-use types and for the NDVI series with the aim of finding coherent groups of counties to unify them into larger, cumulative samples. However, these analyses did not yield the necessary similarities, hence, no further spatial integration was performed. The applied NDVI series are filtered against possible remained atmospheric disturbances, whereas the yield data are standardized against the, actually decreasing, linear trends. The relationships between weekly composite NDVI data and residual yield percentages are rather different for maize and wheat: wheat yield is closely related to the early spring NDVI, whereas for maize yield only the much later, near-harvest periods exhibit some informative value. Since the obtained correlations are rather similar in the neighboring weeks and the weekly NDVI series are strongly auto-correlated, themselves, a four-weekly integration of NDVI is performed before the final estimation of the yield from the NDVI. This integration is performed in four different ways, recommended by literature sources, with no real differences of the results, that promises stability of the correlation, despite the short samples. This statistical predictability of wheat yield residuals with about three months time lead, can be interpreted as follows: Mixed vegetation of the counties indicate the spring restart of wheat development, which conditions determine a substantial part of yield variability.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2399-2404
Number of pages6
JournalAdvances in Space Research
Volume30
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2002

Fingerprint

Hungary
wheat
vegetation index
vegetation
maize
outlier
Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer
Advanced very high resolution radiometers (AVHRR)
cluster analysis
land use
Cluster analysis
AVHRR
irradiance
Land use
proportion
coverings
disturbances
Lead

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics

Cite this

Mika, J., Kerényi, J., Rimóczi-Paál, A., Merza, Á., Szinell, C., & Csiszár, I. (2002). On correlation of maize and wheat yield with NDVI: Example of Hungary (1985-1998). Advances in Space Research, 30(11), 2399-2404. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0273-1177(02)80288-5

On correlation of maize and wheat yield with NDVI : Example of Hungary (1985-1998). / Mika, J.; Kerényi, J.; Rimóczi-Paál, A.; Merza, Á; Szinell, C.; Csiszár, I.

In: Advances in Space Research, Vol. 30, No. 11, 11.2002, p. 2399-2404.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mika, J, Kerényi, J, Rimóczi-Paál, A, Merza, Á, Szinell, C & Csiszár, I 2002, 'On correlation of maize and wheat yield with NDVI: Example of Hungary (1985-1998)', Advances in Space Research, vol. 30, no. 11, pp. 2399-2404. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0273-1177(02)80288-5
Mika, J. ; Kerényi, J. ; Rimóczi-Paál, A. ; Merza, Á ; Szinell, C. ; Csiszár, I. / On correlation of maize and wheat yield with NDVI : Example of Hungary (1985-1998). In: Advances in Space Research. 2002 ; Vol. 30, No. 11. pp. 2399-2404.
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