Ockham's razor at work

Modeling of the "homunculus"

A. Lőrincz, Barnabás Póczos, Gábor Szirtes, Bálint Takács

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is a broad consensus about the fundamental role of the hippocampal system (hippocampus and its adjacent areas) in the encoding and retrieval of episodic memories. This paper presents a functional model of this system. Although memory is not a single-unit cognitive function, we took the view that the whole system of the smooth, interrelated memory processes may have a common basis. That is why we follow the Ockham's razor principle and minimize the size or complexity of our model assumption set. The fundamental assumption is the requirement of solving the so called "homunculus fallacy", which addresses the issue of interpreting the input. Generative autoassociators seem to offer a resolution of the paradox. Learning to represent and to recall information, in these generative networks, imply maximization of information transfer, sparse representation and novelty recognition. A connectionist architecture, which integrates these aspects as model constraints, is derived. Numerical studies demonstrate the novelty recognition and noise filtering properties of the architecture. Finally, we conclude that the derived connectionist architecture can be related to the neurobiological substrate.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)187-220
Number of pages34
JournalBrain and Mind
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2002

Fingerprint

Episodic Memory
Cognition
Noise
Hippocampus
Consensus
Learning
Recognition (Psychology)
Transfer (Psychology)

Keywords

  • Functional modeling
  • Generative networks
  • Homunculus fallacy
  • MMI
  • Recognition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Ockham's razor at work : Modeling of the "homunculus". / Lőrincz, A.; Póczos, Barnabás; Szirtes, Gábor; Takács, Bálint.

In: Brain and Mind, Vol. 3, No. 2, 08.2002, p. 187-220.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lőrincz, A, Póczos, B, Szirtes, G & Takács, B 2002, 'Ockham's razor at work: Modeling of the "homunculus"', Brain and Mind, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 187-220. https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1019996320835
Lőrincz, A. ; Póczos, Barnabás ; Szirtes, Gábor ; Takács, Bálint. / Ockham's razor at work : Modeling of the "homunculus". In: Brain and Mind. 2002 ; Vol. 3, No. 2. pp. 187-220.
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