Nutrition in acute pancreatitis

Hemant M. Kocher, Christos Dervenis, A. Oláh, William R. Murray, Barry Clements, Clement W. Imrie

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Acute pancreatitis is one of the most common diseases in gastroenterology/surgery. The incidence of acute pancreatitis ranges from 10 to 46 per 100,000 people per year. Recent studies have suggested a slightly higher incidence of acute pancreatitis at 56.5 per 100,000 people, which may be linked to socioeconomic deprivation (Ellis et al. 2009). Two percent of all hospital admissions are due to acute pancreatitis. During the last decade, there has been an increase in incidence, mostly due to a higher sensitivity of diagnostic tests. With regard to the clinical course of the disease, it is important to distinguish between mild edematous disease (approximately 85% of all cases) with mortality below 1% and severe necrotising pancreatitis (approximately 15% of all cases) with a fatal outcome in 10-24%. Either clinical course is possible regardless of the underlying etiology of the disease. Up to 90% of all cases of acute pancreatitis are etiologically linked to gallstone disease or alcohol abuse; pancreatitis due to other causes such as hypercalcemia, hyperlipidemia, or infectious agents is rare.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPancreatic Disease: Protocols and Clinical Research
PublisherSpringer London
Pages31-40
Number of pages10
ISBN (Print)9781848821170
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

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Pancreatitis
Incidence
Fatal Outcome
Hypercalcemia
Gallstones
Gastroenterology
Hyperlipidemias
Routine Diagnostic Tests
Alcoholism
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Kocher, H. M., Dervenis, C., Oláh, A., Murray, W. R., Clements, B., & Imrie, C. W. (2010). Nutrition in acute pancreatitis. In Pancreatic Disease: Protocols and Clinical Research (pp. 31-40). Springer London. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-84882-118-7_4

Nutrition in acute pancreatitis. / Kocher, Hemant M.; Dervenis, Christos; Oláh, A.; Murray, William R.; Clements, Barry; Imrie, Clement W.

Pancreatic Disease: Protocols and Clinical Research. Springer London, 2010. p. 31-40.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Kocher, HM, Dervenis, C, Oláh, A, Murray, WR, Clements, B & Imrie, CW 2010, Nutrition in acute pancreatitis. in Pancreatic Disease: Protocols and Clinical Research. Springer London, pp. 31-40. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-84882-118-7_4
Kocher HM, Dervenis C, Oláh A, Murray WR, Clements B, Imrie CW. Nutrition in acute pancreatitis. In Pancreatic Disease: Protocols and Clinical Research. Springer London. 2010. p. 31-40 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-84882-118-7_4
Kocher, Hemant M. ; Dervenis, Christos ; Oláh, A. ; Murray, William R. ; Clements, Barry ; Imrie, Clement W. / Nutrition in acute pancreatitis. Pancreatic Disease: Protocols and Clinical Research. Springer London, 2010. pp. 31-40
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