Ns-Soot: A material-based term for strongly light-absorbing carbonaceous particles

Peter R. Buseck, Kouji Adachi, A. Gelencsér, Éva Tompa, M. Pósfai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The climate-change and environmental literature, including that on aerosols, is replete with mention of black carbon (BC) and soot. The terms are used interchangeably in much of the literature, although BC and soot commonly have operational and source-based definitions, respectively, and reliable reference samples and aerosol standards do not exist for either one. The uncertainty about their exact chemical nature and properties can be decreased by materials-based measurement techniques and terminology. Here, we discuss ambiguities in common uses of BC and soot and propose the term ns-soot, where "ns" refers to carbon nanospheres, for a characteristic constituent of BC and soot. Based on its composition, morphology, and structure, we define ns-soot as particles that consist of nanospheres, typically with diameters

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)777-788
Number of pages12
JournalAerosol Science and Technology
Volume48
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 3 2014

Fingerprint

Soot
soot
black carbon
Carbon black
Nanospheres
Aerosols
aerosol
reference sample
Terminology
terminology
Climate change
material
particle
climate change
Carbon
carbon
Chemical analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Pollution

Cite this

Ns-Soot : A material-based term for strongly light-absorbing carbonaceous particles. / Buseck, Peter R.; Adachi, Kouji; Gelencsér, A.; Tompa, Éva; Pósfai, M.

In: Aerosol Science and Technology, Vol. 48, No. 7, 03.07.2014, p. 777-788.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{88047176e6794f959b99d0983d23b946,
title = "Ns-Soot: A material-based term for strongly light-absorbing carbonaceous particles",
abstract = "The climate-change and environmental literature, including that on aerosols, is replete with mention of black carbon (BC) and soot. The terms are used interchangeably in much of the literature, although BC and soot commonly have operational and source-based definitions, respectively, and reliable reference samples and aerosol standards do not exist for either one. The uncertainty about their exact chemical nature and properties can be decreased by materials-based measurement techniques and terminology. Here, we discuss ambiguities in common uses of BC and soot and propose the term ns-soot, where {"}ns{"} refers to carbon nanospheres, for a characteristic constituent of BC and soot. Based on its composition, morphology, and structure, we define ns-soot as particles that consist of nanospheres, typically with diameters",
author = "Buseck, {Peter R.} and Kouji Adachi and A. Gelencs{\'e}r and {\'E}va Tompa and M. P{\'o}sfai",
year = "2014",
month = "7",
day = "3",
doi = "10.1080/02786826.2014.919374",
language = "English",
volume = "48",
pages = "777--788",
journal = "Aerosol Science and Technology",
issn = "0278-6826",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ns-Soot

T2 - A material-based term for strongly light-absorbing carbonaceous particles

AU - Buseck, Peter R.

AU - Adachi, Kouji

AU - Gelencsér, A.

AU - Tompa, Éva

AU - Pósfai, M.

PY - 2014/7/3

Y1 - 2014/7/3

N2 - The climate-change and environmental literature, including that on aerosols, is replete with mention of black carbon (BC) and soot. The terms are used interchangeably in much of the literature, although BC and soot commonly have operational and source-based definitions, respectively, and reliable reference samples and aerosol standards do not exist for either one. The uncertainty about their exact chemical nature and properties can be decreased by materials-based measurement techniques and terminology. Here, we discuss ambiguities in common uses of BC and soot and propose the term ns-soot, where "ns" refers to carbon nanospheres, for a characteristic constituent of BC and soot. Based on its composition, morphology, and structure, we define ns-soot as particles that consist of nanospheres, typically with diameters

AB - The climate-change and environmental literature, including that on aerosols, is replete with mention of black carbon (BC) and soot. The terms are used interchangeably in much of the literature, although BC and soot commonly have operational and source-based definitions, respectively, and reliable reference samples and aerosol standards do not exist for either one. The uncertainty about their exact chemical nature and properties can be decreased by materials-based measurement techniques and terminology. Here, we discuss ambiguities in common uses of BC and soot and propose the term ns-soot, where "ns" refers to carbon nanospheres, for a characteristic constituent of BC and soot. Based on its composition, morphology, and structure, we define ns-soot as particles that consist of nanospheres, typically with diameters

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84903437758&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84903437758&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/02786826.2014.919374

DO - 10.1080/02786826.2014.919374

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84903437758

VL - 48

SP - 777

EP - 788

JO - Aerosol Science and Technology

JF - Aerosol Science and Technology

SN - 0278-6826

IS - 7

ER -