Novel parvoviruses in reptiles and genome sequence of a lizard parvovirus shed light on Dependoparvovirus genus evolution

Judit J. Pénzes, Hanh T. Pham, M. Benkó, Peter Tijssen

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Abstract

Here, we report the detection and partial genome characterization of two novel reptilian parvoviruses derived from a short-tailed pygmy chameleon (Rampholeon brevicaudatus) and a corn snake (Pantherophis guttatus) along with the complete genome analysis of the first lizard parvovirus, obtained from four bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps). Both homology searches and phylogenetic tree reconstructions demonstrated that all are members of the genus Dependoparvovirus. Even though most dependoparvoviruses replicate efficiently only in co-infections with large DNA viruses, no such agents could be detected in one of the bearded dragon samples, hence the possibility of autonomous replication was explored. The alternative ORF encoding the full assembly activating protein (AAP), typical for the genus, could be obtained from reptilian parvoviruses for the first time, with a structure that appears to be more ancient than that of avian and mammalian parvoviruses. All three viruses were found to harbour short introns as previously observed for snake adeno-associated virus, shorter than that of any non-reptilian dependoparvovirus. According to the phylogenetic calculations based on full non-structural protein (Rep) and AAP sequences, the monophyletic cluster of reptilian parvoviruses seems to be the most basal out of all lineages of genus Dependoparvovirus. The suspected ability for autonomous replication, results of phylogenetic tree reconstruction, intron lengths and the structure of the AAP suggested that a single Squamata origin instead of the earlier assumed diapsid (common avian-reptilian) origin is more likely for the genus Dependoparvovirus of the family Parvoviridae.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2769-2779
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of General Virology
Volume96
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2015

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Parvovirus
Reptiles
Lizards
Genome
Snakes
DNA Replication
Introns
Parvoviridae
Proteins
Dependovirus
DNA Viruses
Coinfection
Open Reading Frames
Zea mays
Viruses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Novel parvoviruses in reptiles and genome sequence of a lizard parvovirus shed light on Dependoparvovirus genus evolution. / Pénzes, Judit J.; Pham, Hanh T.; Benkó, M.; Tijssen, Peter.

In: Journal of General Virology, Vol. 96, No. 9, 01.09.2015, p. 2769-2779.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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