Novel hepatitis C virus-positive cell line derived from a chimpanzee with chronic HCV infection

Borislava G. Pavlova, Z. Schaff, Gerald Eder

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Multipotential cells of mesenchymal origin could be permissive for hepatitis C virus (HCV) that provides the opportunity to study events associated with the viral presence in multiple tissues at various anatomic sites. The capacity of HCV to enter and replicate in immature endometrial cells explains the tracking of extrahepatic viral sequences. An important issue regarding the pathogenesis of HCV-associated diseases and development of antiviral drugs is to determine strategies of virus infection, production, sequence mutation, and target cell permissiveness. This system provides an important tool in understanding the biology of HCV, its life cycle, and presence in multiple tissues. The model is suited for studying new antiviral agents because the HCV-positive endometrial cells represent an immortalized, permanent population useful for prolonged drug screens, the level of viral replication permits easy detection, and the intermittent replication associated with cell-specific virus adaptation mimics the intrinsic replicative cycles and genomic divergence in vivo.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationFrontiers in Viral Hepatitis
PublisherElsevier Inc.
Pages187-196
Number of pages10
ISBN (Print)9780444509864
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2003

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Pan troglodytes
Chronic Hepatitis C
Virus Diseases
Viruses
Hepacivirus
Cells
Cell Line
Antiviral Agents
Permissiveness
Cell Tracking
Life Cycle Stages
Tissue
Life cycle
Mutation
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Novel hepatitis C virus-positive cell line derived from a chimpanzee with chronic HCV infection. / Pavlova, Borislava G.; Schaff, Z.; Eder, Gerald.

Frontiers in Viral Hepatitis. Elsevier Inc., 2003. p. 187-196.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Pavlova, Borislava G. ; Schaff, Z. ; Eder, Gerald. / Novel hepatitis C virus-positive cell line derived from a chimpanzee with chronic HCV infection. Frontiers in Viral Hepatitis. Elsevier Inc., 2003. pp. 187-196
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