Novel features of neurodegeneration in the inner retina of early diabetic rats

Anna Énzsöly, Arnold Szabó, Klaudia Szabó, A. Szél, J. Németh, Ákos Lukáts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The literature indicates that in diabetes retinal dysfunctions related to neural retinal alterations exist prior to clinically detectable vasculopathy. In a previous report, a detailed description about the alteration of the outer retina was given, where diabetic degeneration preceded apoptotic loss of cells (Enzsöly et al., 2014). Here, we investigated the histopathology of the inner retina in early diabetes using the same specimens. We examined rat retinas with immunohistochemistry and Western blotting, 12 weeks after streptozotocin induction of diabetes. Glial reactivity was observed in all diabetic retinal specimens; however, it was not detectable all over the retina, but appeared in randomly arranged patches, with little or no glia activation in between. Similarly, immunoreactivity of parvalbumin (staining mostly AII amacrine cells) was also decreased only in some regions. We propose that these focal changes appear prior to affecting the whole retina and overt loss of cells. In contrast to these, most other markers used (calretinin, recoverin, tyrosin hydroxylase anti-Brn-3a and also calbindin in the optic part of the retina) did not show any major alterations in the intensity of immunoreactivity or in the number of stained elements. Interestingly, under diabetic conditions, the labeling pattern of PKC-a and calbindin in the ciliary retina showed a clear resemblance to the pattern described during development. This observation is in line with our previous study, reporting an increase in the number of dual cones, coexpressing two photopigments, which is another common feature with developing retinas. These data may indicate a previously uninvestigated regenerative capacity in diabetic retina.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)971-985
Number of pages15
JournalHistology and Histopathology
Volume30
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1 2015

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Retina
Calbindins
Neuroglia
Recoverin
Calbindin 2
Amacrine Cells
Parvalbumins
Experimental Diabetes Mellitus
Mixed Function Oxygenases
Western Blotting
Immunohistochemistry
Staining and Labeling

Keywords

  • Calcium binding proteins
  • Diabetic retinopathy
  • Glial reactivity
  • Neurodegeneration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Histology
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Novel features of neurodegeneration in the inner retina of early diabetic rats. / Énzsöly, Anna; Szabó, Arnold; Szabó, Klaudia; Szél, A.; Németh, J.; Lukáts, Ákos.

In: Histology and Histopathology, Vol. 30, No. 8, 01.08.2015, p. 971-985.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Énzsöly, Anna ; Szabó, Arnold ; Szabó, Klaudia ; Szél, A. ; Németh, J. ; Lukáts, Ákos. / Novel features of neurodegeneration in the inner retina of early diabetic rats. In: Histology and Histopathology. 2015 ; Vol. 30, No. 8. pp. 971-985.
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