Novel approach of corn fiber utilization

G. Kálmán, K. Recseg, M. Gáspár, K. Réczey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The corn wet milling process produces a 10% (w/w of the processed corn) byproduct called corn fiber, which is utilized worldwide as a low-value feedstock for cattle. The aim of this study was to find a higher value use of corn fiber. The main fractions of corn fiber are: 20% starch, 40% hemicellulose, 14% cellulose, and 14% protein. Extraction of the highly valuable, cholesterol-lowering corn fiber oil is not feasible owing to its low (2% w/w) concentration in the fiber. The developed technology is based on simple and inexpensive procedures, like washing with hot water, dilute acid hydrolysis at 120°C, enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose, screening, drying, and extraction. The main fractions are sharply separated in the order of starch, hemicellulose, cellulose, lipoprotein, and lignin). The lipoprotein fraction adds up to 10% of the original dry corn fiber, and contains 45% corn fiber oil, thus yielding more oil than direct extraction of the fiber. It is concluded that the defined method makes the extraction of the corn fiber oil economically feasible. The fractionation process also significantly increases the yield of cholesterol-lowering substances (sterols and sterol-esters). At the same time clear and utilizable fractions of monosaccharides, protein, and lignin are produced.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)738-750
Number of pages13
JournalApplied Biochemistry and Biotechnology - Part A Enzyme Engineering and Biotechnology
Volume131
Issue number1-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Fingerprint

Zea mays
Corn Oil
Fibers
Cellulose
Lignin
Oils
Sterols
Starch
Lipoproteins
Hydrolysis
Cholesterol
Monosaccharides
Proteins
Esters
Enzymatic hydrolysis
Fractionation
Technology
Washing
Feedstocks
Acids

Keywords

  • Bioethanol
  • Corn fiber hydrolysis
  • Corn fiber oil
  • Phytosterol

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Biochemistry
  • Biotechnology
  • Bioengineering

Cite this

Novel approach of corn fiber utilization. / Kálmán, G.; Recseg, K.; Gáspár, M.; Réczey, K.

In: Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology - Part A Enzyme Engineering and Biotechnology, Vol. 131, No. 1-3, 2006, p. 738-750.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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