Non-pet dogs as sentinels and potential synanthropic reservoirs of tick-borne and zoonotic bacteria

Sándor Hornok, Béla Dénes, Marina L. Meli, Balázs Tánczos, Lilla Fekete, Miklós Gyuranecz, José de la Fuente, Isabel G.Fernández de Mera, Róbert Farkas, Regina Hofmann-Lehmann

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14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Blood samples were collected from 100 shepherd dogs, 12 hunting dogs and 14 stray dogs (apparently healthy) in southern Hungary to screen for the presence of emerging tick-borne pathogens. Based on real-time PCR results, 14 dogs (11%) had single or dual haemoplasma infection, and a same number of samples were positive for Anaplasma phagocytophilum. In one sample Coxiella burnetii was molecularly identified, and 20.3% of dogs seroconverted to the Q fever agent. Rickettsaemia (sensu stricto) was also detected in one animal. This is the first molecular evidence of autochthonous infection of dogs with the above pathogens in Hungary. The relatively high prevalence of haemoplasma and anaplasma infection among non-pet dogs is suggestive of a prolonged carrier status and bacteraemia of these animals rendering them epidemiologically significant as potential reservoirs and sentinels for tick-borne infections.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)700-703
Number of pages4
JournalVeterinary Microbiology
Volume167
Issue number3-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 27 2013

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Keywords

  • Anaplasma phagocytophilum
  • Coxiella burnetii
  • Haemoplasma
  • Rickettsia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Hornok, S., Dénes, B., Meli, M. L., Tánczos, B., Fekete, L., Gyuranecz, M., de la Fuente, J., Mera, I. G. F. D., Farkas, R., & Hofmann-Lehmann, R. (2013). Non-pet dogs as sentinels and potential synanthropic reservoirs of tick-borne and zoonotic bacteria. Veterinary Microbiology, 167(3-4), 700-703. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vetmic.2013.08.011