Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma in a Kidney Transplant Patient: A Case Report

Lóránt Illésy, Réka P. Szabó, Dávid Ágoston Kovács, Roland Fedor, B. Nemes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders are a possible complication of kidney transplant due to chronic immunosuppressive therapy, and they can elevate the mortality rate. Furthermore, the type of clinical appearance has a wide range. We describe a case of a 38-year-old male recipient who developed post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders and received successful treatment. The recipient had received a kidney with 1 HLA-B and 1 HLA-DR match, and the deceased donor allotransplant was performed successfully on December 9, 2012. The cause of kidney failure was membranoproliferative-glomerulonephritis proved by biopsy results. The induction therapy was antithymocyte globulin; the basic immunosuppressive therapy consisted of tacrolimus, steroid, and mycophenolate mofetil. After 2 months the patient had elevated serum creatinine level, and biopsy results revealed cellular rejection (Banff grade I). We applied steroid bolus therapy. After that the graft worked properly for 5 years, and the patient had no symptoms or complaints; then he had right lower abdomen pain. After urgent procedures (laboratory diagnostics, abdominal ultrasonography, computed tomography), we operated on the patient in a short time, and after a few weeks the fluorescence in situ hybridization confirmed the translocation of region C-myc; the diagnosis was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. With the assistance of hematologists, the patient received adequate therapy. He was asymptomatic half a year after the rituximab with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, methotrexate/ifosfamide, etoposide, and high-dose cytarabine protocol therapy; the lymphoma is in remission. Our case is worth presenting because immunosuppressive drugs can modify the clinical picture, complicating the diagnosis and delaying treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1286-1288
Number of pages3
JournalTransplantation Proceedings
Volume51
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1 2019

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Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
Transplants
Kidney
Immunosuppressive Agents
Lymphoproliferative Disorders
Therapeutics
Steroids
Mycophenolic Acid
Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis
Biopsy
Ifosfamide
Antilymphocyte Serum
HLA-B Antigens
Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse
Cytarabine
Tacrolimus
Vincristine
HLA-DR Antigens
Etoposide
Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma in a Kidney Transplant Patient : A Case Report. / Illésy, Lóránt; Szabó, Réka P.; Kovács, Dávid Ágoston; Fedor, Roland; Nemes, B.

In: Transplantation Proceedings, Vol. 51, No. 4, 01.05.2019, p. 1286-1288.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Illésy, Lóránt ; Szabó, Réka P. ; Kovács, Dávid Ágoston ; Fedor, Roland ; Nemes, B. / Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma in a Kidney Transplant Patient : A Case Report. In: Transplantation Proceedings. 2019 ; Vol. 51, No. 4. pp. 1286-1288.
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