Non-destructive quality monitoring of stored tomatoes using VIS-NIR spectroscopy

Abdelgawad Saad, Shyam Narayan Jha, Pranita Jaiswal, Neha Srivastava, L. Helyes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The postharvest quality and storage life of vegetables are controlled by maturity due to their cells still alive after harvest and continue their physiological activity. The objective of this study was to monitoring physico-chemical quality parameters of intact tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum) during storage (18 °C, 85% RH) for 12 days, based upon visible/near-infrared (VIS/NIR) absorbance spectroscopy from 350 nm to 1050 nm. Partial least squares regression (PLSR) was applied to estimate soluble solids content (SSC), Titratable acidity (TA), and lycopene content of the tomatoes. The PLSR calibration model with SSC at 12 days storage, gave the highest coefficient of determination (R2) = 0.91, root mean squared error of prediction (RMSEP) = 0.285 and bias = -0.003. While the lowest R2 with lycopene (0.73) and bias of -0.002 at harvesting day. Changes of sweetness index (SI), SSC, TA and lycopene content varied from 7.16 to 11.39, 4.25 to 5.51 °Brix, 0.5936 to 0.4837% and 8.65-42.69 mg/kg fresh tomato, respectively. While, Hunter colour values L∗, a∗, and b∗were changed from 60.5 to 38.86, -2.85 to 36.59 and 37.07 to 30.92, respectively. The results showed that physico-chemical quality parameters changes significantly during storage of turning maturity tomatoes and have potential application in the field of post-harvesting.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)158-164
Number of pages7
JournalEngineering in Agriculture, Environment and Food
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 2016

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Near-Infrared Spectroscopy
near-infrared spectroscopy
Lycopersicon esculentum
lycopene
total soluble solids
Spectroscopy
tomatoes
Acidity
Monitoring
monitoring
Least-Squares Analysis
titratable acidity
least squares
Near infrared spectroscopy
Vegetables
sweetness
brix
storage quality
quality of life
Calibration

Keywords

  • Partial least squares regression (PLSR)
  • Physico-chemical parameters
  • Tomato storage
  • VIS-NIR spectroscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
  • Food Science
  • Chemical Engineering(all)

Cite this

Non-destructive quality monitoring of stored tomatoes using VIS-NIR spectroscopy. / Saad, Abdelgawad; Jha, Shyam Narayan; Jaiswal, Pranita; Srivastava, Neha; Helyes, L.

In: Engineering in Agriculture, Environment and Food, Vol. 9, No. 2, 01.04.2016, p. 158-164.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Saad, Abdelgawad ; Jha, Shyam Narayan ; Jaiswal, Pranita ; Srivastava, Neha ; Helyes, L. / Non-destructive quality monitoring of stored tomatoes using VIS-NIR spectroscopy. In: Engineering in Agriculture, Environment and Food. 2016 ; Vol. 9, No. 2. pp. 158-164.
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