Non-conventional role of lysosomal acid phosphatase in olfactory receptor axons

Co-localization with growth-associated phosphoprotein-43

J. R. Wolff, W. L. Liu, H. Böttcher, I. Krizbai, F. Joó, P. Saftig, A. Párducz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Olfactory receptor neurons undergo a continuous turnover in adult mammals. It is largely unknown how their axons invade the olfactory bulb and induce synaptic re-organization in glomeruli. Here, the cytochemical localization of lysosomal acid phosphatase has been studied in olfactory bulbs of adult rats and mice. The enzyme has been identified by specific substrate, inhibitors and absence in lysosomal acid phosphatase-knockout mice. Lysosomal acid phosphatase is located in primary and secondary lysosomes, which are unevenly distributed in the olfactory nerve layer and among olfactory glomeruli. In consecutive sections of glomeruli, the intensity of lysosomal acid phosphatase immunoreactivity co-varied with that of growth-associated phosphoprotein. Electron microscopically, differential lysosomal acid phosphatase staining in glomeruli corresponded to different proportions of labelled and unlabelled axons. Quantification revealed that lysosomal acid phosphatase labelling was strongest in non-synaptic profiles of terminal axons, while it was weak in or even missing from most synaptic profiles. Hence, growing olfactory axons apparently carry more lysosomal acid phopshatase than those which have established synaptic contacts. Following olfactory deafferentation both lysosomal acid phosphatase activity and growth-associated phosphoprotein-43 are lost from glomeruli, suggesting that both proteins are expressed in olfactory sensory axons during growth, while lysosomal acid phosphatase is apparently not a marker of anterograde terminal degeneration.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)887-891
Number of pages5
JournalNeuroscience
Volume79
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 26 1997

Fingerprint

Odorant Receptors
Phosphoproteins
Acid Phosphatase
Axons
Growth
Olfactory Bulb
Olfactory Receptor Neurons
Olfactory Nerve
Presynaptic Terminals
Lysosomes
Knockout Mice
Mammals
Electrons
Staining and Labeling
Acids

Keywords

  • GAP- 43/B50
  • Lysosomal acid phosphatase
  • Neuroplasticity
  • Olfactory bulb
  • Olfactory receptor axons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Non-conventional role of lysosomal acid phosphatase in olfactory receptor axons : Co-localization with growth-associated phosphoprotein-43. / Wolff, J. R.; Liu, W. L.; Böttcher, H.; Krizbai, I.; Joó, F.; Saftig, P.; Párducz, A.

In: Neuroscience, Vol. 79, No. 3, 26.05.1997, p. 887-891.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{3e64ec6bf8f84edcbc9d7e0f8abad2c9,
title = "Non-conventional role of lysosomal acid phosphatase in olfactory receptor axons: Co-localization with growth-associated phosphoprotein-43",
abstract = "Olfactory receptor neurons undergo a continuous turnover in adult mammals. It is largely unknown how their axons invade the olfactory bulb and induce synaptic re-organization in glomeruli. Here, the cytochemical localization of lysosomal acid phosphatase has been studied in olfactory bulbs of adult rats and mice. The enzyme has been identified by specific substrate, inhibitors and absence in lysosomal acid phosphatase-knockout mice. Lysosomal acid phosphatase is located in primary and secondary lysosomes, which are unevenly distributed in the olfactory nerve layer and among olfactory glomeruli. In consecutive sections of glomeruli, the intensity of lysosomal acid phosphatase immunoreactivity co-varied with that of growth-associated phosphoprotein. Electron microscopically, differential lysosomal acid phosphatase staining in glomeruli corresponded to different proportions of labelled and unlabelled axons. Quantification revealed that lysosomal acid phosphatase labelling was strongest in non-synaptic profiles of terminal axons, while it was weak in or even missing from most synaptic profiles. Hence, growing olfactory axons apparently carry more lysosomal acid phopshatase than those which have established synaptic contacts. Following olfactory deafferentation both lysosomal acid phosphatase activity and growth-associated phosphoprotein-43 are lost from glomeruli, suggesting that both proteins are expressed in olfactory sensory axons during growth, while lysosomal acid phosphatase is apparently not a marker of anterograde terminal degeneration.",
keywords = "GAP- 43/B50, Lysosomal acid phosphatase, Neuroplasticity, Olfactory bulb, Olfactory receptor axons",
author = "Wolff, {J. R.} and Liu, {W. L.} and H. B{\"o}ttcher and I. Krizbai and F. Jo{\'o} and P. Saftig and A. P{\'a}rducz",
year = "1997",
month = "5",
day = "26",
doi = "10.1016/S0306-4522(97)00030-4",
language = "English",
volume = "79",
pages = "887--891",
journal = "Neuroscience",
issn = "0306-4522",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Non-conventional role of lysosomal acid phosphatase in olfactory receptor axons

T2 - Co-localization with growth-associated phosphoprotein-43

AU - Wolff, J. R.

AU - Liu, W. L.

AU - Böttcher, H.

AU - Krizbai, I.

AU - Joó, F.

AU - Saftig, P.

AU - Párducz, A.

PY - 1997/5/26

Y1 - 1997/5/26

N2 - Olfactory receptor neurons undergo a continuous turnover in adult mammals. It is largely unknown how their axons invade the olfactory bulb and induce synaptic re-organization in glomeruli. Here, the cytochemical localization of lysosomal acid phosphatase has been studied in olfactory bulbs of adult rats and mice. The enzyme has been identified by specific substrate, inhibitors and absence in lysosomal acid phosphatase-knockout mice. Lysosomal acid phosphatase is located in primary and secondary lysosomes, which are unevenly distributed in the olfactory nerve layer and among olfactory glomeruli. In consecutive sections of glomeruli, the intensity of lysosomal acid phosphatase immunoreactivity co-varied with that of growth-associated phosphoprotein. Electron microscopically, differential lysosomal acid phosphatase staining in glomeruli corresponded to different proportions of labelled and unlabelled axons. Quantification revealed that lysosomal acid phosphatase labelling was strongest in non-synaptic profiles of terminal axons, while it was weak in or even missing from most synaptic profiles. Hence, growing olfactory axons apparently carry more lysosomal acid phopshatase than those which have established synaptic contacts. Following olfactory deafferentation both lysosomal acid phosphatase activity and growth-associated phosphoprotein-43 are lost from glomeruli, suggesting that both proteins are expressed in olfactory sensory axons during growth, while lysosomal acid phosphatase is apparently not a marker of anterograde terminal degeneration.

AB - Olfactory receptor neurons undergo a continuous turnover in adult mammals. It is largely unknown how their axons invade the olfactory bulb and induce synaptic re-organization in glomeruli. Here, the cytochemical localization of lysosomal acid phosphatase has been studied in olfactory bulbs of adult rats and mice. The enzyme has been identified by specific substrate, inhibitors and absence in lysosomal acid phosphatase-knockout mice. Lysosomal acid phosphatase is located in primary and secondary lysosomes, which are unevenly distributed in the olfactory nerve layer and among olfactory glomeruli. In consecutive sections of glomeruli, the intensity of lysosomal acid phosphatase immunoreactivity co-varied with that of growth-associated phosphoprotein. Electron microscopically, differential lysosomal acid phosphatase staining in glomeruli corresponded to different proportions of labelled and unlabelled axons. Quantification revealed that lysosomal acid phosphatase labelling was strongest in non-synaptic profiles of terminal axons, while it was weak in or even missing from most synaptic profiles. Hence, growing olfactory axons apparently carry more lysosomal acid phopshatase than those which have established synaptic contacts. Following olfactory deafferentation both lysosomal acid phosphatase activity and growth-associated phosphoprotein-43 are lost from glomeruli, suggesting that both proteins are expressed in olfactory sensory axons during growth, while lysosomal acid phosphatase is apparently not a marker of anterograde terminal degeneration.

KW - GAP- 43/B50

KW - Lysosomal acid phosphatase

KW - Neuroplasticity

KW - Olfactory bulb

KW - Olfactory receptor axons

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0030765437&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0030765437&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0306-4522(97)00030-4

DO - 10.1016/S0306-4522(97)00030-4

M3 - Article

VL - 79

SP - 887

EP - 891

JO - Neuroscience

JF - Neuroscience

SN - 0306-4522

IS - 3

ER -