Noble gas and nitrogen isotopic components in Oceanic Island Basalts

R. K. Mohapatra, D. Harrison, U. Ott, J. D. Gilmour, M. Trieloff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We present helium, argon, xenon and nitrogen isotopic data from Oceanic Island Basalts (OIBs), obtained from stepped heating and vacuum crushing experiments. Signatures of 3He/4He in the present samples, except for those from the Canary Islands, are significantly higher (up to 20 × the air ratio) than the MORB signature (8.5 × air ratio). The argon (40Ar/36Ar) and xenon (129Xe/132Xe and 136Xe/132Xe) isotopic data are consistent with a two-component mixture of gases from the mantle (either MORB or OIB source) and air contamination. In the stepwise heating data, δ15N varies from - 20‰ to + 15‰ in the different heating steps. The vacuum crushing data show a narrower range (- 5‰ to + 8‰) of δ15N, which, except for one Réunion sample, is somewhat heavier than the totals from the stepped heating experiments. Simultaneous argon and nitrogen isotopic systematics of the present data suggest contributions from mantle (somewhat different from MORB), recycled materials and air contamination. This is also consistent with the 36Ar/132Xe elemental ratio. The present stepped heating data are consistent with a nitrogen isotopic component with δ15N ~ - 25‰ in the OIB mantle. In line with the oxygen isotopic composition of the bulk Earth, this would be consistent with a contribution from enstatite chondrite-like volatiles to the planet's accretion.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)29-37
Number of pages9
JournalChemical Geology
Volume266
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 15 2009

Fingerprint

Noble Gases
noble gas
Nitrogen
basalt
Argon
Heating
nitrogen
heating
argon
mid-ocean ridge basalt
Xenon
Crushing
Air
xenon
air
crushing
mantle
Contamination
Vacuum
Helium

Keywords

  • Mantle nitrogen
  • Nitrogen isotopes
  • Noble gases
  • Oceanic Island Basalt
  • Planetary precursors
  • Recycled material

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Geology

Cite this

Mohapatra, R. K., Harrison, D., Ott, U., Gilmour, J. D., & Trieloff, M. (2009). Noble gas and nitrogen isotopic components in Oceanic Island Basalts. Chemical Geology, 266(1-2), 29-37. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chemgeo.2009.03.022

Noble gas and nitrogen isotopic components in Oceanic Island Basalts. / Mohapatra, R. K.; Harrison, D.; Ott, U.; Gilmour, J. D.; Trieloff, M.

In: Chemical Geology, Vol. 266, No. 1-2, 15.08.2009, p. 29-37.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mohapatra, RK, Harrison, D, Ott, U, Gilmour, JD & Trieloff, M 2009, 'Noble gas and nitrogen isotopic components in Oceanic Island Basalts', Chemical Geology, vol. 266, no. 1-2, pp. 29-37. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chemgeo.2009.03.022
Mohapatra, R. K. ; Harrison, D. ; Ott, U. ; Gilmour, J. D. ; Trieloff, M. / Noble gas and nitrogen isotopic components in Oceanic Island Basalts. In: Chemical Geology. 2009 ; Vol. 266, No. 1-2. pp. 29-37.
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AB - We present helium, argon, xenon and nitrogen isotopic data from Oceanic Island Basalts (OIBs), obtained from stepped heating and vacuum crushing experiments. Signatures of 3He/4He in the present samples, except for those from the Canary Islands, are significantly higher (up to 20 × the air ratio) than the MORB signature (8.5 × air ratio). The argon (40Ar/36Ar) and xenon (129Xe/132Xe and 136Xe/132Xe) isotopic data are consistent with a two-component mixture of gases from the mantle (either MORB or OIB source) and air contamination. In the stepwise heating data, δ15N varies from - 20‰ to + 15‰ in the different heating steps. The vacuum crushing data show a narrower range (- 5‰ to + 8‰) of δ15N, which, except for one Réunion sample, is somewhat heavier than the totals from the stepped heating experiments. Simultaneous argon and nitrogen isotopic systematics of the present data suggest contributions from mantle (somewhat different from MORB), recycled materials and air contamination. This is also consistent with the 36Ar/132Xe elemental ratio. The present stepped heating data are consistent with a nitrogen isotopic component with δ15N ~ - 25‰ in the OIB mantle. In line with the oxygen isotopic composition of the bulk Earth, this would be consistent with a contribution from enstatite chondrite-like volatiles to the planet's accretion.

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