No relationship between cerebral blood flow velocity and cerebrovascular reserve capacity and contemporaneously measured glucose and insulin concentrations in diabetes mellitus

B. Fülesdi, M. Limburg, D. Bereczki, C. Molnár, R. P J Michels, Z. Leányvári, L. Csiba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Blood glucose and insulin concentrations have been reported to influence cerebral hemodynamics. We studied the relationship between actual blood glucose and insulin concentrations and resting cerebral blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery and cerebrovascular reserve capacity after acetazolamide stimulation. Thirty-six insulin-dependent diabetic patients in a state of good glycemic control were studied. Blood samples were taken for determination of glucose and insulin concentrations. Subsequently we measured resting cerebral blood flow velocities in supine position using transcranial Doppler, administered 1 g acetazolamide intravenously, and repeated the measurements after 5, 10, 15 and 20 minutes. Cerebrovascular reserve was calculated as the maximal percent increase after acetazolamide stimulation. Multiple regression was used for statistical analysis. Blood glucose levels were not correlated with resting blood flow velocity (R = 0.21, p = 0.22) nor cerebrovascular reserve capacity (R = 0.17, p = 0.32). Similarly, no correlation was found between insulin concentrations, resting cerebral blood flow velocity (R = 0.24, p = 0.22) and cerebrovascular reserve (R = 0.26, p = 0.24). Studying patients with long-term (> 10 years) and short-term (≤ 10 years) disease duration yielded the same lack of correlation. We conclude that there is no significant correlation between contemporaneously measured glucose and insulin concentrations and either cerebral blood flow velocity or cerebrovascular reserve capacity in the middle cerebral artery in type 1 diabetic patients with good control.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)191-195
Number of pages5
JournalActa Diabetologica
Volume36
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1999

Fingerprint

Cerebrovascular Circulation
Blood Flow Velocity
Diabetes Mellitus
Insulin
Glucose
Acetazolamide
Blood Glucose
Middle Cerebral Artery
Supine Position
Hemodynamics

Keywords

  • Acetazolamide
  • Cerebral hemodynamics
  • Cerebrovascular reserve capacity
  • Glucose and insulin concentration
  • Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus
  • Transcranial Doppler

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

No relationship between cerebral blood flow velocity and cerebrovascular reserve capacity and contemporaneously measured glucose and insulin concentrations in diabetes mellitus. / Fülesdi, B.; Limburg, M.; Bereczki, D.; Molnár, C.; Michels, R. P J; Leányvári, Z.; Csiba, L.

In: Acta Diabetologica, Vol. 36, No. 4, 1999, p. 191-195.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Leányvári, Z.

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