No evidence for impaired 'theory of mind' in unaffected first-degree relatives of schizophrenia patients

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

73 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility that 'theory of mind' (ToM) impairments are associated with schizophrenia liability. Method: Forty healthy control subjects and 79 first-degree biological relatives of schizophrenia patients (32 siblings and 47 parents) received the Eyes Test, during which subjects are asked to choose the word best describes the mental state of a person whose eyes are depicted on a photograph. Results: The affected relatives (n = 14) performed worse on the Eyes Test compared with the controls (P = 0.0001), whereas the unaffected relatives (n = 65) showed intact performances (P = 0.4). The Eyes Test values did not correlate with age and IQ. There was no significant difference between male and female participants. Conclusion: ToM deficits, as measured by the Eyes Test, are not associated with schizophrenia liability.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)146-149
Number of pages4
JournalActa Psychiatrica Scandinavica
Volume110
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2004

Fingerprint

Theory of Mind
Schizophrenia
Siblings
Healthy Volunteers
Parents

Keywords

  • Cognitive dysfunction
  • Eyes Test endophenotype
  • Genetic liability
  • Schizophrenia
  • Theory of mind

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

@article{1b05ecace3bf49398f8b1ad20062636d,
title = "No evidence for impaired 'theory of mind' in unaffected first-degree relatives of schizophrenia patients",
abstract = "Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility that 'theory of mind' (ToM) impairments are associated with schizophrenia liability. Method: Forty healthy control subjects and 79 first-degree biological relatives of schizophrenia patients (32 siblings and 47 parents) received the Eyes Test, during which subjects are asked to choose the word best describes the mental state of a person whose eyes are depicted on a photograph. Results: The affected relatives (n = 14) performed worse on the Eyes Test compared with the controls (P = 0.0001), whereas the unaffected relatives (n = 65) showed intact performances (P = 0.4). The Eyes Test values did not correlate with age and IQ. There was no significant difference between male and female participants. Conclusion: ToM deficits, as measured by the Eyes Test, are not associated with schizophrenia liability.",
keywords = "Cognitive dysfunction, Eyes Test endophenotype, Genetic liability, Schizophrenia, Theory of mind",
author = "O. Kelemen and S. K{\'e}ri and A. Must and G. Benedek and Z. Janka",
year = "2004",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1111/j.1600-0047.2004.00357.x",
language = "English",
volume = "110",
pages = "146--149",
journal = "Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica",
issn = "0001-690X",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - No evidence for impaired 'theory of mind' in unaffected first-degree relatives of schizophrenia patients

AU - Kelemen, O.

AU - Kéri, S.

AU - Must, A.

AU - Benedek, G.

AU - Janka, Z.

PY - 2004/8

Y1 - 2004/8

N2 - Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility that 'theory of mind' (ToM) impairments are associated with schizophrenia liability. Method: Forty healthy control subjects and 79 first-degree biological relatives of schizophrenia patients (32 siblings and 47 parents) received the Eyes Test, during which subjects are asked to choose the word best describes the mental state of a person whose eyes are depicted on a photograph. Results: The affected relatives (n = 14) performed worse on the Eyes Test compared with the controls (P = 0.0001), whereas the unaffected relatives (n = 65) showed intact performances (P = 0.4). The Eyes Test values did not correlate with age and IQ. There was no significant difference between male and female participants. Conclusion: ToM deficits, as measured by the Eyes Test, are not associated with schizophrenia liability.

AB - Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility that 'theory of mind' (ToM) impairments are associated with schizophrenia liability. Method: Forty healthy control subjects and 79 first-degree biological relatives of schizophrenia patients (32 siblings and 47 parents) received the Eyes Test, during which subjects are asked to choose the word best describes the mental state of a person whose eyes are depicted on a photograph. Results: The affected relatives (n = 14) performed worse on the Eyes Test compared with the controls (P = 0.0001), whereas the unaffected relatives (n = 65) showed intact performances (P = 0.4). The Eyes Test values did not correlate with age and IQ. There was no significant difference between male and female participants. Conclusion: ToM deficits, as measured by the Eyes Test, are not associated with schizophrenia liability.

KW - Cognitive dysfunction

KW - Eyes Test endophenotype

KW - Genetic liability

KW - Schizophrenia

KW - Theory of mind

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=3242781600&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=3242781600&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1600-0047.2004.00357.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1600-0047.2004.00357.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 15233715

AN - SCOPUS:3242781600

VL - 110

SP - 146

EP - 149

JO - Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica

JF - Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica

SN - 0001-690X

IS - 2

ER -