Nitric oxide signaling modulates synaptic transmission during early postnatal development

Csaba Cserép, András Sznyi, Judit M. Veres, Beáta Németh, Eszter Szabadits, Jan De Vente, Norbert Hájos, Tamás F. Freund, Gábor Nyiri

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17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Early γ-aminobutyric acid mediated (GABAergic) synaptic transmission and correlated neuronal activity are fundamental to network formation; however, their regulation during early postnatal development is poorly understood. Nitric oxide (NO) is an important retrograde messenger at glutamatergic synapses, and it was recently shown to play an important role also at GABAergic synapses in the adult brain. The subcellular localization and network effect of this signaling pathway during early development are so far unexplored, but its disruption at this early age is known to lead to profound morphological and functional alterations. Here, we provide functional evidence-using whole-cell recording-that NO signaling modulates not only glutamatergic but also GABAergic synaptic transmission in the mouse hippocampus during the early postnatal period. We identified the precise subcellular localization of key elements of the underlying molecular cascade using immunohistochemistry at the light-and electronmicroscopic levels. As predicted by these morpho-functional data, multineuron calcium imaging in acute slices revealed that this NO-signaling machinery is involved also in the control of synchronous network activity patterns. We suggest that the retrograde NO-signaling system is ideally suited to fulfill a general presynaptic regulatory role and may effectively fine-tune network activity during early postnatal development, while GABAergic transmission is still depolarizing.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2065-2074
Number of pages10
JournalCerebral Cortex
Volume21
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2011

Keywords

  • GABAergic synapse
  • hippocampus
  • nNOS
  • retrograde signaling
  • synchronous activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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  • Cite this

    Cserép, C., Sznyi, A., Veres, J. M., Németh, B., Szabadits, E., De Vente, J., Hájos, N., Freund, T. F., & Nyiri, G. (2011). Nitric oxide signaling modulates synaptic transmission during early postnatal development. Cerebral Cortex, 21(9), 2065-2074. https://doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhq281