Nitric oxide, chronic inflammation and autoimmunity

György Nagy, Joanna M. Clark, E. Búzás, Claire L. Gorman, Andrew P. Cope

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

107 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Whilst many physiological functions of nitric oxide (NO) have been revealed so far, recent evidence proposes an essential role for NO in T lymphocyte activation and signal transduction. NO acts as a second messenger, activating soluble guanyl cyclase and participating in signal transduction pathways involving cyclic GMP. NO modulates mitochondrial events that are involved in apoptosis and regulates mitochondrial biogenesis in many cell types, including lymphocytes. Several studies undertaken on patients with RA and SLE have documented increased endogenous NO synthesis, although the effects of NO may be distinct. Here, we discuss recent evidence that NO contributes to T cell dysfunction in both SLE and RA by altering multiple signaling pathways in T cells. Although NO may play a physiological role in lymphocyte cell signaling, its overproduction may perturb T cell activation, differentiation and effector responses, each of which may contribute in different ways to the pathogenesis of autoimmunity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-5
Number of pages5
JournalImmunology Letters
Volume111
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 31 2007

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Autoimmunity
Nitric Oxide
Inflammation
T-Lymphocytes
Signal Transduction
Lymphocytes
Guanylate Cyclase
Cyclic GMP
Second Messenger Systems
Organelle Biogenesis
Lymphocyte Activation
Cell Differentiation
Apoptosis

Keywords

  • Nitric oxide
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Nitric oxide, chronic inflammation and autoimmunity. / Nagy, György; Clark, Joanna M.; Búzás, E.; Gorman, Claire L.; Cope, Andrew P.

In: Immunology Letters, Vol. 111, No. 1, 31.07.2007, p. 1-5.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nagy, György ; Clark, Joanna M. ; Búzás, E. ; Gorman, Claire L. ; Cope, Andrew P. / Nitric oxide, chronic inflammation and autoimmunity. In: Immunology Letters. 2007 ; Vol. 111, No. 1. pp. 1-5.
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