Nickel-tolerant Brevibacillus brevis and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus can reduce metal acquisition and nickel toxicity effects in plant growing in nickel supplemented soil

A. Vivas, B. Bíró, T. Németh, J. M. Barea, R. Azcón

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53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The growth of clover (Trifolium repens) and its uptake of N, P and Ni were studied following inoculation of soil with Rhizobium trifolii, and combinations of two Ni-adapted indigenous bacterial isolates (one of them was Brevibacillus brevis) and an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus (Glomus mosseae). Plant growth was measured in a pot experiment containing soil spiked with 30 (Ni I), 90 (Ni II) or 270 (Ni III) mg kg-1 Ni-sulphate (corresponding to 11.7, 27.6 and 65.8mg kg-1 available Ni on a dry soil basis). Single inoculation with the most Ni-tolerant bacterial isolate (Brevibacillus brevis) was particularly effective in increasing shoot and root biomass at the three levels of Ni contamination in comparison with the other indigenous bacterial inoculated or control plants. Single colonisation of G. mosseae enhanced by 3 fold (Ni I), by 2.4 fold (Ni II) and by 2.2 fold (Ni III) T. repens dry weight and P-content of the shoots increased by 9.8 fold (Ni I), by 9.9 fold (Ni II) and by 5.1 fold (Ni III) concomitantly with a reduction in Ni concentration in the shoot compared with non-treated plants. Coinoculation of G. mosseae and the Ni-tolerant bacterial strain (B. brevis) achieved the highest plant dry biomass (shoot and root) and N and P content and the lowest Ni shoot concentration. Dual inoculation with the most Ni-tolerant autochthonous microorganisms (B. brevis and G. mosseae) increased shoot and root plant biomass and subtantially reduced the specific absorption rate (defined as the amount of metal absorbed per unit of root biomass) for nickel in comparison with plants grown in soil inoculated only with G. mosseae. B. brevis increased nodule number that was highly depressed in Ni I added soil or supressed in Ni II and Ni III supplemented soil. These results suggest that selected bacterial inoculation improved the mycorrhizal benefit in nutrients uptake and in decreasing Ni toxicity. Inoculation of adapted beneficial microorganisms (as autochthonous B. brevis and G. mosseae) may be used as a tool to enhance plant performance in soil contaminated with Ni.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2694-2704
Number of pages11
JournalSoil Biology and Biochemistry
Volume38
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2006

Fingerprint

Brevibacillus
Brevibacillus brevis
Glomus mosseae
Nickel
Fungi
nickel
mycorrhizal fungi
Toxicity
Soil
Metals
metals
fungus
toxicity
shoot
Soils
inoculation
shoots
fold
metal
Biomass

Keywords

  • Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi
  • Brevibacillus sp.
  • Nickel-tolerance
  • Phytoremediation
  • Rhizobium sp.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Soil Science
  • Biochemistry
  • Ecology

Cite this

@article{ad70afe0da0d4cf2a1d8eaf07d41dcf1,
title = "Nickel-tolerant Brevibacillus brevis and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus can reduce metal acquisition and nickel toxicity effects in plant growing in nickel supplemented soil",
abstract = "The growth of clover (Trifolium repens) and its uptake of N, P and Ni were studied following inoculation of soil with Rhizobium trifolii, and combinations of two Ni-adapted indigenous bacterial isolates (one of them was Brevibacillus brevis) and an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus (Glomus mosseae). Plant growth was measured in a pot experiment containing soil spiked with 30 (Ni I), 90 (Ni II) or 270 (Ni III) mg kg-1 Ni-sulphate (corresponding to 11.7, 27.6 and 65.8mg kg-1 available Ni on a dry soil basis). Single inoculation with the most Ni-tolerant bacterial isolate (Brevibacillus brevis) was particularly effective in increasing shoot and root biomass at the three levels of Ni contamination in comparison with the other indigenous bacterial inoculated or control plants. Single colonisation of G. mosseae enhanced by 3 fold (Ni I), by 2.4 fold (Ni II) and by 2.2 fold (Ni III) T. repens dry weight and P-content of the shoots increased by 9.8 fold (Ni I), by 9.9 fold (Ni II) and by 5.1 fold (Ni III) concomitantly with a reduction in Ni concentration in the shoot compared with non-treated plants. Coinoculation of G. mosseae and the Ni-tolerant bacterial strain (B. brevis) achieved the highest plant dry biomass (shoot and root) and N and P content and the lowest Ni shoot concentration. Dual inoculation with the most Ni-tolerant autochthonous microorganisms (B. brevis and G. mosseae) increased shoot and root plant biomass and subtantially reduced the specific absorption rate (defined as the amount of metal absorbed per unit of root biomass) for nickel in comparison with plants grown in soil inoculated only with G. mosseae. B. brevis increased nodule number that was highly depressed in Ni I added soil or supressed in Ni II and Ni III supplemented soil. These results suggest that selected bacterial inoculation improved the mycorrhizal benefit in nutrients uptake and in decreasing Ni toxicity. Inoculation of adapted beneficial microorganisms (as autochthonous B. brevis and G. mosseae) may be used as a tool to enhance plant performance in soil contaminated with Ni.",
keywords = "Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, Brevibacillus sp., Nickel-tolerance, Phytoremediation, Rhizobium sp.",
author = "A. Vivas and B. B{\'i}r{\'o} and T. N{\'e}meth and Barea, {J. M.} and R. Azc{\'o}n",
year = "2006",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1016/j.soilbio.2006.04.020",
language = "English",
volume = "38",
pages = "2694--2704",
journal = "Soil Biology and Biochemistry",
issn = "0038-0717",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Nickel-tolerant Brevibacillus brevis and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus can reduce metal acquisition and nickel toxicity effects in plant growing in nickel supplemented soil

AU - Vivas, A.

AU - Bíró, B.

AU - Németh, T.

AU - Barea, J. M.

AU - Azcón, R.

PY - 2006/9

Y1 - 2006/9

N2 - The growth of clover (Trifolium repens) and its uptake of N, P and Ni were studied following inoculation of soil with Rhizobium trifolii, and combinations of two Ni-adapted indigenous bacterial isolates (one of them was Brevibacillus brevis) and an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus (Glomus mosseae). Plant growth was measured in a pot experiment containing soil spiked with 30 (Ni I), 90 (Ni II) or 270 (Ni III) mg kg-1 Ni-sulphate (corresponding to 11.7, 27.6 and 65.8mg kg-1 available Ni on a dry soil basis). Single inoculation with the most Ni-tolerant bacterial isolate (Brevibacillus brevis) was particularly effective in increasing shoot and root biomass at the three levels of Ni contamination in comparison with the other indigenous bacterial inoculated or control plants. Single colonisation of G. mosseae enhanced by 3 fold (Ni I), by 2.4 fold (Ni II) and by 2.2 fold (Ni III) T. repens dry weight and P-content of the shoots increased by 9.8 fold (Ni I), by 9.9 fold (Ni II) and by 5.1 fold (Ni III) concomitantly with a reduction in Ni concentration in the shoot compared with non-treated plants. Coinoculation of G. mosseae and the Ni-tolerant bacterial strain (B. brevis) achieved the highest plant dry biomass (shoot and root) and N and P content and the lowest Ni shoot concentration. Dual inoculation with the most Ni-tolerant autochthonous microorganisms (B. brevis and G. mosseae) increased shoot and root plant biomass and subtantially reduced the specific absorption rate (defined as the amount of metal absorbed per unit of root biomass) for nickel in comparison with plants grown in soil inoculated only with G. mosseae. B. brevis increased nodule number that was highly depressed in Ni I added soil or supressed in Ni II and Ni III supplemented soil. These results suggest that selected bacterial inoculation improved the mycorrhizal benefit in nutrients uptake and in decreasing Ni toxicity. Inoculation of adapted beneficial microorganisms (as autochthonous B. brevis and G. mosseae) may be used as a tool to enhance plant performance in soil contaminated with Ni.

AB - The growth of clover (Trifolium repens) and its uptake of N, P and Ni were studied following inoculation of soil with Rhizobium trifolii, and combinations of two Ni-adapted indigenous bacterial isolates (one of them was Brevibacillus brevis) and an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus (Glomus mosseae). Plant growth was measured in a pot experiment containing soil spiked with 30 (Ni I), 90 (Ni II) or 270 (Ni III) mg kg-1 Ni-sulphate (corresponding to 11.7, 27.6 and 65.8mg kg-1 available Ni on a dry soil basis). Single inoculation with the most Ni-tolerant bacterial isolate (Brevibacillus brevis) was particularly effective in increasing shoot and root biomass at the three levels of Ni contamination in comparison with the other indigenous bacterial inoculated or control plants. Single colonisation of G. mosseae enhanced by 3 fold (Ni I), by 2.4 fold (Ni II) and by 2.2 fold (Ni III) T. repens dry weight and P-content of the shoots increased by 9.8 fold (Ni I), by 9.9 fold (Ni II) and by 5.1 fold (Ni III) concomitantly with a reduction in Ni concentration in the shoot compared with non-treated plants. Coinoculation of G. mosseae and the Ni-tolerant bacterial strain (B. brevis) achieved the highest plant dry biomass (shoot and root) and N and P content and the lowest Ni shoot concentration. Dual inoculation with the most Ni-tolerant autochthonous microorganisms (B. brevis and G. mosseae) increased shoot and root plant biomass and subtantially reduced the specific absorption rate (defined as the amount of metal absorbed per unit of root biomass) for nickel in comparison with plants grown in soil inoculated only with G. mosseae. B. brevis increased nodule number that was highly depressed in Ni I added soil or supressed in Ni II and Ni III supplemented soil. These results suggest that selected bacterial inoculation improved the mycorrhizal benefit in nutrients uptake and in decreasing Ni toxicity. Inoculation of adapted beneficial microorganisms (as autochthonous B. brevis and G. mosseae) may be used as a tool to enhance plant performance in soil contaminated with Ni.

KW - Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

KW - Brevibacillus sp.

KW - Nickel-tolerance

KW - Phytoremediation

KW - Rhizobium sp.

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U2 - 10.1016/j.soilbio.2006.04.020

DO - 10.1016/j.soilbio.2006.04.020

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:33846911140

VL - 38

SP - 2694

EP - 2704

JO - Soil Biology and Biochemistry

JF - Soil Biology and Biochemistry

SN - 0038-0717

IS - 9

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