Newly recognized player in breast cancer risk: Light deficiency

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

North-America and northern European countries exhibit the highest incidence rate of breast cancer, whereas women in southern regions are relatively protected. Immigrants from low cancer incidence regions to high-incidence areas might exhibit similarly higher or excessive cancer risk as compared with the inhabitants of their adoptive country. Additional cancer risk may be conferred by incongruence between their biological characteristics and foreign environment. Many studies established the racial/ethnic disparities in the risk and nature of female breast cancer in United States between African-American and Caucasian women. Mammary tumors in black women are diagnosed at an earlier age, and are associated with a higher rate of mortality as compared with cancers of white cases. Results of the studies on these ethnic/racial differences in breast cancer incidence suggest that excessive pigmentation of dark skinned women results in a relative light-deficiency. Poor light exposure may explain the deleterious metabolic and hormonal alterations; such as insulin-resistance, deficiencies of estrogen, thyroxin and vitamin-D conferring excessive cancer risk. The more northern the location of an adoptive country, the higher the cancer risk for dark skinned immigrants. Recognition of the deleterious systemic effects of darkness and excessive melatonin synthesis enables cancer protection treatment for people living in light-deficient environment.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEstrogen Prevention for Breast Cancer
PublisherNova Science Publishers, Inc.
Pages77-92
Number of pages16
ISBN (Print)9781624173783
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2013

Fingerprint

Breast Neoplasms
Light
Neoplasms
Incidence
Melatonin
Thyroxine
Vitamin D
Tumors
Estrogens
Darkness
Pigmentation
North America
Insulin
African Americans
Insulin Resistance
Mortality
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Suba, Z. (2013). Newly recognized player in breast cancer risk: Light deficiency. In Estrogen Prevention for Breast Cancer (pp. 77-92). Nova Science Publishers, Inc..

Newly recognized player in breast cancer risk : Light deficiency. / Suba, Z.

Estrogen Prevention for Breast Cancer. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2013. p. 77-92.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Suba, Z 2013, Newly recognized player in breast cancer risk: Light deficiency. in Estrogen Prevention for Breast Cancer. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., pp. 77-92.
Suba Z. Newly recognized player in breast cancer risk: Light deficiency. In Estrogen Prevention for Breast Cancer. Nova Science Publishers, Inc. 2013. p. 77-92
Suba, Z. / Newly recognized player in breast cancer risk : Light deficiency. Estrogen Prevention for Breast Cancer. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2013. pp. 77-92
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