New radiolarian biostratigraphic age constraints on Middle Triassic basalts and radiolarites from the Inner Hellenides (Northern Pindos and Othris Mountains, Northern Greece) and their implications for the geodynamic evolution of the early Mesozoic Neotethys

Péter Ozsvárt, Lajos Dosztály, Georgios Migiros, Vassilis Tselepidis, Sándor Kovács

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Avdella Mélange in the northern Pindos Mountains and its equivalent formation, the Loggitsion Unit in the Othris Mountains expose early Mesozoic (Mid-Late Triassic) oceanic fragments beneath the Western Greek Ophiolite Belt of the Inner Hellenides, Northern Greece. The mélange consists of locally interfingering blocks and slices of ribbon radiolarite, radiolarian chert and pillow basalt and is usually overthrust by Jurassic ophiolites. New Middle and Upper Triassic radiolarian biostratigraphic data are presented from radiolarites and basalt-radiolarite sequences within mélange blocks. Pillow basalts associated with the radiolarites provide clues to the opening of the Neotethyan ocean basin. The radiolarians indicate a Middle Triassic age (latest Anisian, probably early Illyrian), which is documented for the first time in the northern Pindos Mountains. The new radiolarian biostratigraphic data suggest that rift-type basalt volcanism already began in pre-Ladinian time (late Scythian?-Anisian). These basalts were then overlain by Upper Anisian to Carnian (?Norian) radiolarites.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1487-1501
Number of pages15
JournalInternational Journal of Earth Sciences
Volume101
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2012

Keywords

  • Basalts
  • Greece
  • Hellenides
  • Radiolarians
  • Radiolarites
  • Triassic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

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