New direct and indirect methods for the detection of cyclooxygenase 1 acetylation by aspirin; The lack of aspirin resistance among healthy individuals

Emese G. Kovács, E. Katona, Z. Bereczky, Nóra Homoródi, László Balogh, Eszter Tóth, Hajna Péterfy, R. Kiss, I. Édes, L. Muszbek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Aspirin is widely used in the prevention of acute atherothrombotic complications. It acetylates Ser529 residue in cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and prevents thromboxane A2 (TXA2) formation from arachidonic acid (AA) in platelets. Laboratory methods used for the detection of aspirin effect provide inconsistent results. Methods Two new methods were developed for the direct and indirect detection of COX-1 acetylation by aspirin in 108 healthy volunteers treated daily with 100 mg enteric-coated aspirin for 7 days. Monoclonal antibodies were raised against acetylated and non-acetylated nonapeptides corresponding to the amino acid sequence of human COX-1 525-533 residues. Using Western blotting technique the antibodies clearly distinguished between acetylated and non-acetylated COX-1 in platelet lysate. The second method measures AA-induced TXB2 production of platelets in diluted platelet rich plasma. Results No acetylated COX-1 was detected in platelets before aspirin treatment. At the same time antibodies raised against non-acetylated peptide gave intense reaction with COX-1 on the Western blot. In contrast, after 7 days of aspirin treatment, with a single exception, only acetylated COX-1 could be detected in the platelet lysate. The non-responding volunteer showed full response to aspirin after controlled drug intake. In parallel experiments aspirin treatment for 7 days practically completely inhibited AA-induced TXB2 production by platelets. Conclusions Chemical ("true") aspirin resistance, if it exists, must be a rarity among healthy individuals. The new methods could be used for detecting the acetylation of COX-1 by aspirin in patients on preventive aspirin therapy and for evaluating methods routinely used for such purpose.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)320-324
Number of pages5
JournalThrombosis Research
Volume131
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2013

Fingerprint

Cyclooxygenase 1
Acetylation
Aspirin
Blood Platelets
Arachidonic Acid
Western Blotting
Thromboxane A2
Platelet-Rich Plasma
Antibodies
Therapeutics
Volunteers
Amino Acid Sequence
Healthy Volunteers
Monoclonal Antibodies

Keywords

  • aspirin
  • aspirin resistance
  • cyclooxygenase
  • platelet
  • thromboxane

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

New direct and indirect methods for the detection of cyclooxygenase 1 acetylation by aspirin; The lack of aspirin resistance among healthy individuals. / Kovács, Emese G.; Katona, E.; Bereczky, Z.; Homoródi, Nóra; Balogh, László; Tóth, Eszter; Péterfy, Hajna; Kiss, R.; Édes, I.; Muszbek, L.

In: Thrombosis Research, Vol. 131, No. 4, 04.2013, p. 320-324.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background Aspirin is widely used in the prevention of acute atherothrombotic complications. It acetylates Ser529 residue in cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and prevents thromboxane A2 (TXA2) formation from arachidonic acid (AA) in platelets. Laboratory methods used for the detection of aspirin effect provide inconsistent results. Methods Two new methods were developed for the direct and indirect detection of COX-1 acetylation by aspirin in 108 healthy volunteers treated daily with 100 mg enteric-coated aspirin for 7 days. Monoclonal antibodies were raised against acetylated and non-acetylated nonapeptides corresponding to the amino acid sequence of human COX-1 525-533 residues. Using Western blotting technique the antibodies clearly distinguished between acetylated and non-acetylated COX-1 in platelet lysate. The second method measures AA-induced TXB2 production of platelets in diluted platelet rich plasma. Results No acetylated COX-1 was detected in platelets before aspirin treatment. At the same time antibodies raised against non-acetylated peptide gave intense reaction with COX-1 on the Western blot. In contrast, after 7 days of aspirin treatment, with a single exception, only acetylated COX-1 could be detected in the platelet lysate. The non-responding volunteer showed full response to aspirin after controlled drug intake. In parallel experiments aspirin treatment for 7 days practically completely inhibited AA-induced TXB2 production by platelets. Conclusions Chemical ({"}true{"}) aspirin resistance, if it exists, must be a rarity among healthy individuals. The new methods could be used for detecting the acetylation of COX-1 by aspirin in patients on preventive aspirin therapy and for evaluating methods routinely used for such purpose.",
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AU - Homoródi, Nóra

AU - Balogh, László

AU - Tóth, Eszter

AU - Péterfy, Hajna

AU - Kiss, R.

AU - Édes, I.

AU - Muszbek, L.

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N2 - Background Aspirin is widely used in the prevention of acute atherothrombotic complications. It acetylates Ser529 residue in cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and prevents thromboxane A2 (TXA2) formation from arachidonic acid (AA) in platelets. Laboratory methods used for the detection of aspirin effect provide inconsistent results. Methods Two new methods were developed for the direct and indirect detection of COX-1 acetylation by aspirin in 108 healthy volunteers treated daily with 100 mg enteric-coated aspirin for 7 days. Monoclonal antibodies were raised against acetylated and non-acetylated nonapeptides corresponding to the amino acid sequence of human COX-1 525-533 residues. Using Western blotting technique the antibodies clearly distinguished between acetylated and non-acetylated COX-1 in platelet lysate. The second method measures AA-induced TXB2 production of platelets in diluted platelet rich plasma. Results No acetylated COX-1 was detected in platelets before aspirin treatment. At the same time antibodies raised against non-acetylated peptide gave intense reaction with COX-1 on the Western blot. In contrast, after 7 days of aspirin treatment, with a single exception, only acetylated COX-1 could be detected in the platelet lysate. The non-responding volunteer showed full response to aspirin after controlled drug intake. In parallel experiments aspirin treatment for 7 days practically completely inhibited AA-induced TXB2 production by platelets. Conclusions Chemical ("true") aspirin resistance, if it exists, must be a rarity among healthy individuals. The new methods could be used for detecting the acetylation of COX-1 by aspirin in patients on preventive aspirin therapy and for evaluating methods routinely used for such purpose.

AB - Background Aspirin is widely used in the prevention of acute atherothrombotic complications. It acetylates Ser529 residue in cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and prevents thromboxane A2 (TXA2) formation from arachidonic acid (AA) in platelets. Laboratory methods used for the detection of aspirin effect provide inconsistent results. Methods Two new methods were developed for the direct and indirect detection of COX-1 acetylation by aspirin in 108 healthy volunteers treated daily with 100 mg enteric-coated aspirin for 7 days. Monoclonal antibodies were raised against acetylated and non-acetylated nonapeptides corresponding to the amino acid sequence of human COX-1 525-533 residues. Using Western blotting technique the antibodies clearly distinguished between acetylated and non-acetylated COX-1 in platelet lysate. The second method measures AA-induced TXB2 production of platelets in diluted platelet rich plasma. Results No acetylated COX-1 was detected in platelets before aspirin treatment. At the same time antibodies raised against non-acetylated peptide gave intense reaction with COX-1 on the Western blot. In contrast, after 7 days of aspirin treatment, with a single exception, only acetylated COX-1 could be detected in the platelet lysate. The non-responding volunteer showed full response to aspirin after controlled drug intake. In parallel experiments aspirin treatment for 7 days practically completely inhibited AA-induced TXB2 production by platelets. Conclusions Chemical ("true") aspirin resistance, if it exists, must be a rarity among healthy individuals. The new methods could be used for detecting the acetylation of COX-1 by aspirin in patients on preventive aspirin therapy and for evaluating methods routinely used for such purpose.

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