Neutrophil cell surface receptors and their intracellular signal transduction pathways

Krisztina Futosi, Szabina Fodor, Attila Mócsai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

233 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Neutrophils play a critical role in the host defense against bacterial and fungal infections, but their inappropriate activation also contributes to tissue damage during autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Neutrophils express a large number of cell surface receptors for the recognition of pathogen invasion and the inflammatory environment. Those include G-protein-coupled chemokine and chemoattractant receptors, Fc-receptors, adhesion receptors such as selectins/selectin ligands and integrins, various cytokine receptors, as well as innate immune receptors such as Toll-like receptors and C-type lectins. The various cell surface receptors trigger very diverse signal transduction pathways including activation of heterotrimeric and monomeric G-proteins, receptor-induced and store-operated Ca2 + signals, protein and lipid kinases, adapter proteins and cytoskeletal rearrangement. Here we provide an overview of the receptors involved in neutrophil activation and the intracellular signal transduction processes they trigger. This knowledge is crucial for understanding how neutrophils participate in antimicrobial host defense and inflammatory tissue damage and may also point to possible future targets of the pharmacological therapy of neutrophil-mediated autoimmune or inflammatory diseases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)638-650
Number of pages13
JournalInternational Immunopharmacology
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 17 2013

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Keywords

  • Inflammation
  • Kinases
  • Neutrophils
  • Receptors
  • Signaling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Pharmacology

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